Compare and Contrast Mlk and Malcolm X

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Amidst the dark clouds, clouds that rose far away destroying the clear sky of this country over the course of decades, rose two significant figures. They were the fighters, the leaders, the teachers; they were the generals who led their forces of justice and equality against the numbering and thundering dark clouds; their men stood together, side by side, and fought courageously to win the war against the darkness of racism. These men, however, belonged to two forces; one was led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the other, a much aggressive one, by Malcolm X. While being unquestionably different, they were alike; they both fought for the same goal, but on different battlegrounds.

Martin Luther King and Malcolm (Little) X were both students, and bright ones at that! They, amongst the conflicts that the society presented, managed rather peculiarly to keep their minds open; that is, to say, they amassed copious amounts of knowledge about the life in this world. They composed their own philosophies and believed them to be true. They were superlatively the most committed believers of their theories. They both felt compelled to end the racism that the world offered towards the African-American society. For that reason, they set out with one common goal: to abolish this racism forever.

As mentioned above, they both share some similarities and copious dissimilarities. Throughout their lives, Martin Luther King and Malcolm X were role models in the continuous battle against racism. They both gave powerful speeches on racism; however their intentions were delivered with different styles and purposes. King had a more positive and idealistic approach compared to Malcolm X's more pessimistic views. King was hopeful in believing that someday, blacks would achieve full equality with whites. Non–violent demonstrations and arguments were King's techniques in reaching equality. Malcolm X, on the other hand, viewed non-violence and integration as a way of the "whites...
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