Compare and Contrast English 125 Introduction to Literature

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Compare and Contrast English 125 Introduction to Literature

By | November 2011
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Themes & Corresponding Works Whether reading a short story or a poem, there is always a story to be found within. The authors of these scripts are able to capture readers with the utilization of characterization, rhythm, or a fairytale setting throughout their narrative. It is imagination that sanctions the reader of these literary forms to be able to mentally visualize what the author would like the reader to visually perceive by use of symbolism or descriptive wording. In the poem “The Road Not Taken” (Frost, 1916) or short stories “A Worn Path” Welty, 1941 or “Used to Live Here Once” (Rhys, 1976) – There is a prevalent theme. No matter what solitary journey we find ourselves on, ‘we’ determine how the journey ends.

The solitary journey that each of these literary pieces share is presented differently in each inciting. Robert Frost designed “The Road Not Taken” with specific designs in the narrative that revealed for me as the reader that there was a forthcoming journey. Frost also utilized the word “I” many times, which sanctioned me to imagine him alone. Comparative to this example let us compare “A Worn Path” where Welty utilized the word “she” throughout the writing piece. The linguistic choice inspired my imagination to visualize a woman walking alone. This visualization was reinforced in other places of the writing when the character spoke to animals to get out of her way: “Out of my way, all you foxes, owls, and beetles”. When Welty posed this conversation in the story, it gave me a sense of solitude. The submission that the woman also was walking an uphill path provided the symbolic comparison to a ‘hard life’. Walking uphill for any length of time is exhausting...