Comparative Programmes of Business Education in Nigerian Universities (a Case Study of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma and Delta State University, Abraka)

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Current Research Journal of Social Sciences 2(2): 58-64, 2010 ISSN: 2041-3246 © M axwell Scientific Organization, 2010 Submitted Date: November 18, 2009 Accepted Date: December 14, 2009

Accepted Date: March 10, 2010

Comparative Programmes of Business Education In Nigerian Universities (A Case Study of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma and Delta State University, Abraka) 1

F.O. Ohiwerei and 2 N. A zih Department of Vocational and Technical Education, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpom a, Edo State, Nig eria 2 Departm ent of Business Education, E bon yi State University, Abakaliki, Eb ony i State, Nigeria

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Abstract: This paper is aimed to critically x-ray the business education curriculum of Nigerian Universities a case study of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma and Delta State U niversity, Ab raka. It w as observed that in Amb rose Alli University business education is housed in the department of Vocational and Technical Education with two options namely Accounting Education and Secretarial Education while it runs a specialized system right from 1 00 to 4 00 lev els. On the other hand the Delta State University runs a 100 to 200 levels broad based system. Specialization is done in 300 and 400 levels. Here business education is a unit of its own; housing accounting option, secretarial option, management option, but unfortunately computer education options is not functional. It was observed that the objectives, philosophy and ad mission requ irements of bo th universities are the same. While courses offered are different in nature. Conclusion and recommendations were made. Key w ords: Business educ ation, curriculu m, effectiveness, pro gram me, teachin g, univ ersity INTRODUCTION Education is the totality of life experience that man acquires and which enables him to cope with and derive satisfaction from living in the word. This is because it enables him to achieve social competence and optimum individual development. Broken down, business education which is a subset of the general education can be seen as the development of person’s h ead, heart and han ds for his self fulfillment and optimum service s to human ity. To achieve this according to the National Policy on Education (2004), compu ter education was integra ted into the primary school curriculum, a welcome development but sad to note that sub jects like shorthand, typewriting, commerce, and book-keeping are integrated together to form business studies thereby losing their original identity. Experience has shown that most people are not interested in business education as a profession with the mind set that it is education meant for the less privilege or a programme, which up on graduation, there is no opportunity for securing a job. This is so because Bu siness educ ation curriculum planners who are not profe ssional membe rs in the field could not design a uniform curriculum that will ho use all the universities offering business educ ation courses in Nigeria. The incompetence on the part of business education graduates also lays on the curriculum not properly designed to reflect the psychomotor nature of our noble profession. Pitman (1974) defin ed curriculum as a prescribed courses of studies. While Hornby (2006) says curriculum are the subjects that are included in a course of study or taugh t in a school, college, etc. According to Okoye (1991), the process of curricu lum developm ent and plan ning is continuo us. It does not end once and for all time. Acco rding to Uwaifo (2006) a close look at the current Vocational and Technical Education curriculum g enera lly reveals some problems that border on inadequate course content. Uhumuavbi and Ebhomhen (20 06) in their ow n vain stated that irrespective of the level of education and training given during the pre-colonial days in Africa, it was functional because the curriculum was relevant to the needs of the society. Unemployment if it existed at all was minimal and very few young men roamed the villages...
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