Community Communication

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Developing Peace
Peace-building through Community Development
A Project Plan

Table of Contents

I. Introduction
II. Proposed Project
a. Objectives
b. Strategies
c. Key Result Areas
d. Leadership Formation
e. Community Livelihood Enhancement
f. Communication
III. Project Chart and Budget
a. Activities
b. Timeframe
c. Budget
d. Responsible Person
IV. Management
a. Project Manager
b. Project Accountant/Cashier
c. Bookkeeper/Property Custodian
d. Project Staff

Chapter I
Introduction
The vicinities of Iligan City are often rocked by clan wars known in the local dialect as RIDU. Most prominent among the communities are the Barangays of Rogongon, Kalilangan, and Panoroganan where there is a mix of inhabitants composed of the Higaonons, Kolibogans, and Christian Settlers.

The Higaonons are an ethnic group who inhabited the mountainous areas of the Provinces of Bukidnon and Misamis Oriental. The Kolibogan is a hybrid ethnic grouping since it is the result of the inter-marriage of the Maranaos from Lanao del Sur and the Higaonons. The third group who inhabit the said communities are Christian settlers mostly Cebuano and Boholanos. Among the three groups, the Kolibogans and Higaonons are the more dominant both in terms of population size and in terms of economic wealth and access to political power.

RIDU is a cultural practice common among the Maranaos of Lanao and the Higaonons of Bukidnon. This practice follows the old dictum: an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth. When a certain member of a certain clan is either harmed or humiliated or killed, they are bound by this tradition to do exactly the same to the clan responsible for the crime until it becomes an endless tale of vengeance. Failure to take revenge the fallen clan member is an indication of poor Maratabat, a Maranao term without a direct English translation but which in practice could mean pride, morale, or integrity. When a member of the clan is humiliated, the maratabat of the whole clan is undermined so that to recover one’s maratabat, one has to humiliate back or inflict pain on the other party.

This tradition has nurtured a culture of violence in the hinterland barangays. Often, when violence as part of RIDU would erupt, whole villages would have to evacuate to safer places, leaving their farms and their livestock behind.

At one point, several houses in Kalilangan were burned by people believed to be from Panoroganan. The reason for the burning is related to a case of theft believed to be perpetrated by some youth from Kalilangan who came to the forests of Panoroganan to cut trees as part of the illegal lumber trade. As they went home, they took the carabao of one of the residents of Panoroganan.

The burning of several houses pushed people to immediately leave their place and went to the communities near the city. For more than six months, not a single family went back to Kalilangan. Their rice and corn rotted in the farms, and their livestock including a few carabaos and goats were stolen by people from Rogongon and from the adjacent communities of Lanao del Sur.

The result of the occasional rise of violence is economic displacement and disruption of other equally important community activities such as schools. With such tradition strongly implanted in the day to day life of the people, traditional development intervention could hardly alter the economic landscape of the communities. And as the culture of violence spread through through the generations, the people of Rogongon, Kalilangan and Panoroganan will continue to live impoverished lives.

Unfortunately, the local governing structure and the traditional leaders have failed miserably in the prevention of conflicts, although they have been quite successful in conflict mediation and resolution.

I. Proposed Project
The proposed project is a one year intervention plan meant to jumpstart the...
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