Common Sense by Thomas Paine

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Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Thomas Paine created some of the most significant pamphlets about the colonial situation in the 1700’s. As the American Revolution was on the brink of separation, he had the opportunity to make his opinions known through his writing. Paine was most famous at the time for his writings such as Common Sense and his Crisis papers. Through his particular style of reasoning and passion, Paine’s Common Sense became very essential for America's decision to declare independence from Britain. Part of Paine’s main motives was for people to understand his opinions clearly through his writings. Paine’s writings gave his readers a chance to read on with an open mind and to create an opinion for them. Paine sought to give “nothing more but simple facts, plain arguments, and common sense.” Paine’s attitude in the start of his writing is more of a calmly approach, although, he later he is more enthusiastic. Paine's argument was first based on general views about government and religion. For example, “Of more worth is one honest man to society and in the sight of God, than all the crowned ruffians that every lived.” Paine uses distinguished words to express the importance he feels this matter takes, stating “The sun never shined on a cause of greater worth.” Throughout “Common Sense”, Paine uses more examples as he goes more into an elaboration with his passionate comments. Paine puts in plain words that a compromise is not a choice. He describes American being united and dependent on Britain as a negative outcome. For example he says, “As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not sufficiently lasting to ensure anything which we may bequeath to posterity: And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take our children in our hand, and fix our...
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