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  • Topic: Jagannath, Jagannath Temple, Puri
  • Pages : 12 (3791 words )
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  • Published : April 19, 2013
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Appliqué, a variety of embroidery, is supposed to be found as an example that dates back to 980 BC in Egypt which can so be even before. Appliqué as an art is an important part in the life of Benin, West Africa, particularly in the area around Abomey, where it is prevalent since the 18th century and the kingdom of Danhome. In India this art is widely practised in the western states, especially Gujarat and Rajasthan and in eastern coast of Orissa. Appliqué work probably made its way to India through trade contact with Europe or Arabia in the Middle East. Though it is a simple stitching craft yet it is widely popular for its beauty grace and prominence. In Orissa, vibrant red, purple black, yellow, green and white colored fabrics are chosen as base material for the appliqué work. The base fabric is prepared in the shapes of square, rectangle, circle or oval. The motifs for appliqué are then cut out in shapes of birds, animals, flowers, leaves, celestial bodies, geometric pattern in contrasted colours. These pieces are attached to the base cloth with intricate stitches like bakhia, gunta, turpa, chikan and other delicate embroideries. Now days small mirrors, beads, metal pieces and several other accessories are also attached to the Appliqué work to make it much attractive Appliqué work in Orissa is an inseparable part of temple tradition. Its main centre of production is in and around Pipli, a town near Bhubaneswar. It is said that the appliqué work is patronized by the kings and nobility of Orissa. In 1054, Maharaja Birakshore is said to have appointed ‘Darjis’ to serve the temple of Lord Jagannatha. He set up the village of Pipli to accommodate the craftsmen of Orissa. Initially the craftsmen made banners, umbrellas and canopies for the annual chariot festival of Lord Jagannatha, Lord Balabhadra and Subhadra at Puri. But with the increasing popularity of this art the craftsmen started making other utility and decorative items used for the everyday household. Now the appliqué work of Orissa includes bed cover, cushion cover, wall hanging, pillow cover, bags, canopies, lampshades, garden umbrellas and many more items that stand with its eternal pride

  Pipli is the capital of applique craft in Orissa. Most of the work sold on the street stalls of Pipli is produced for a growing tourist market, however supurb craftwork is still produced and available if you have the time to look around. Where is Pipili situated?

Pipli Sasan and Darji Sahi villages are better known as Pipli. They are nearly 20 km from Bhubaneswar, the capital of Orrissa. What are the tourist attractions of Pipli?
The villagers of Pipli produce applique art, a process of cutting coloured cloth into shapes of animals, birds, flowers leaves gods, goddesses and other decorative motifs and stitching them over a piece of cloth. These creations are then fabricated into lampshades, handbags, cushion covers or even garden umbrellas. A famous example is the enormous appliqué canopies above the reigning deity of Puri, Lord Jagannath. How do I reach Pipli?

The best way to reach Pipli is by availing the regular bus service from Puri town. The nearest railway station is Puri and the nearest airport is at Bhubeneshwar. Who are the host community?
The 2 hamlets together sustain a population of about 224 families of various castes. Tailoring is the main profession. What is the vision for Pipli?
The visitors will experience the intense local artistry contrasting with leisurely rural encounters. The project will facilitate genuine cultural and heritage work by the artisans and support activities in the social sphere, forestry performing arts, organic farming and riverbank maintenance. What is the applique art?

Appliqué is art, a process of cutting coloured cloth into shapes of animals, birds, flowers leaves gods, goddesses and other decorative motifs and stitching them on a piece of cloth

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