Color of Light Affecting the Growth of Alaskan Pea Plants

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Color of Light Effecting the Growth of Alaskan Pea Plants

2012
Phillipa Watson
Sixth Hour
Mrs. Davis

Table of Contents
Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………………3 Statement of Problem……………………………………………………………………………...3 Review of Literature…………………………………………………………………………….3-5 Hypothesis…………………………………………………………………………………………5 Variables and Groups……………………………………………………………………………5 Materials…………………………………………………………………………………………..6 Procedure………………………………………………………………………………………….6 Results………………………………………………………………………………………......7-8 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………...9 Bibliography……………………………………………………………………………...……9-10

Abstract
Pea plants, along with many other plants and vegetables, are taken for granted. Without them, much of the world would be different and it would affect the planet in a negative manner. Therefore, it is necessary for plants to be able to grow. In this paper, there is information on seed germination and light’s effects on plants. These are important part of seeds’ growth and they were a part of the experiment that was performed and then analyzed in this paper. The experiment tested the color of light’s effect on an Alaskan pea plants’ growth throughout the course of fourteen days. The colors used in the experiment are red and green. Plants absorb red light and it is good for growth while plants reflect green light so it is not the most ideal light for growth.

Statement of Problem
Does the color of light affect the growth of an Alaskan pea plant? Review of Literature
Seeds must protect themselves until they are in the right conditions for them to grow. Until the conditions are right, seeds are dormant and appear dead and it is difficult to tell if they are actually alive (Germination). The embryo within a seed will eventually die while it is dormant if it doesn’t begin germination by a certain time. Depending on the seed, the length of viability can be a few weeks, to hundreds of years (Germination). Germination begins when dormant seeds are under conditions that are necessary for growth and survival, such as light, water and warmth (Kennell). Germination is the process in which growth in a plant seed are activated from a resting stage and begin to grow (Kennell). To begin germination, a seed must imbibe, or absorb, large amounts of water (Hangarter). This is done in order to activate enzymes, hydrate a seed’s food supply, and begin plant respiration and the duplicating of the plant cells. As the seed continues to absorb more water, the embryo breaks open the protective seed coat, emerging as a plant (Kennell). The first part of the part of the seedling to come out from a plant is the root and is eventually followed by the shoot of the plant.

Light is a necessary factor for plants because without it, they would not be able to undergo photosynthesis, the process in which plants make their food. Quality, quantity, and duration of light are the most important characteristics of light for a plant (VanDerZaden). The amount of light given determine a plant’s capacity of producing food (VanDerZaden). Therefore, plants grow better in the summer because of the amount of light that it absorbs along with the fact that the temperature is ideal for plant growth. The quality of light has to do with the color/wavelength (VanDerZaden). Sunlight is the most effective on plant growth because it consists of the complete range of wavelengths (VanDerZaden). Plants absorb red and blue lights causing those two colors of light to be the most effective on plant growth. Green light is the least effective because plants actually reflect green light rather than absorb which is the reason why plants appear green (Whiting). The reason fluorescent lights are effective on the growth of plants is because it is high in the blue wavelength which is helpful to start up seedlings (VanDerZaden). The amount of time plants are exposed to light, or photoperiod, determines the flowering in plants (VanDerZaden). For a time, it was...
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