Collision and Conservation of Momentum

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Collision and Conservation of Momentum
Collision, a normal phenomenon in our daily life, also is familiar by people in physics field. As we can imagine, there are many interesting among collision cause our attention to think about what is this exactly about and how does is work or maybe why is that such as there maybe some neutron stars intensely hurtling in outer space or two small eggs hitting each other. Outer space is filled with infinite particles that maybe as small as things people cant find out or measure so far and collisions are mostly about those small particles moving and hitting. For example, light wouldn’t be so bright according to its mass and the reason that it delivers light is because collision -- namely fraction – to produce photon and then integrate light. A collision is an isolated event in which two o more moving bodies exert forces on each other for a relatively short time. Even though, many people would refer collision to accidents where there are object badly crashed, what my topic will be focused on are those phenomenon among physics world. Moreover, when scientists use the word of “collision”, they try to imply nothing about the magnitude of the forces. Collision was ever a hot topic drawing many physicists’ attention. After plenty of delving, physicists establish the momentum conservation law. Collision is a typical characteristic in microcosm in physics. Fortunately, collision can be simply solved from difficultly by using momentum conservation law to explain the details. Collisions are divided into two types – elastic collision and inelastic collision – by measuring loss of kinetic energy in the collision. Elastic collision is defined as one in which there is no loss of kinetic energy in the collision. As we can imagine in macroscopic aspect, any collision between objects will convert some kinetic energy to internal energy and other forms of energy. As a result, we can assume that no large-scale impacts are perfectly elastic. In...
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