College Student Perceived Stress: Athlete vs. Non-Athlete

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College Student Perceived Stress: Athlete vs. Non-Athlete
Langeda Bontemps
Longwood University

Author Note
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Langeda Bontemps, Department of Psychology, Longwood University, Farmville, VA 23909. Email: langeda.bontemps@live.longwood.edu

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Abstract
According to research college athletes are viewed of having two different roles, one as a student and one as an athlete (Settles, Sellers, & Damas, 2002), Research has shown that college student athletes endure multiple complications throughout their college life. This specific study is looking at the amount of stress student athletes experience by comparing the average amount of stress they deal with to college students. In this experiment undergraduate, psychology students, and Division 1 student athlete at a public university are participating in this study voluntarily. The independent variable is whether the college student is a student athlete or not. The dependent variable is looking specifically at the amount of stress one encounter throughout a semester by completing “The Inventory of College Students' Recent Life Experiences” (ICSRLE). Student athletes will report more stress than non-student athletes. College student athletes have to constantly battle their two roles of being a student and an athlete which brings complications. Keywords: college students, college student athletes, roles, stress

When entering college for the first time, students encounter multiple challenges throughout their college experience. Being a college athlete comes with a lot of challenges that varies from non-athletes. However, what would one considered to be a student athlete? According to Pinkerton, Hinz, and Barrow (1989), Student-Athlete, athlete, or college athlete are defined as students whose participation is needed by athletic coaches or other representative of athletic interest with the whole purpose of the student’s total involvement in the intercollegiate athletic program. College student athletes have a huge chance of experiencing various amount crises or distress (Pinkerton, Hinz, & Barrow, 1989). Lazarus and Folkman (1996) have defined stress as the negative feeling that happens when an individual have a hard time handling all obstacles that is occurring in one environment. However, for freshman student athletes their challenges or obstacles become more intense and terrifying due to being fresh and new to the system (Wilson & Pritchard, 2005). Amount of Stress College Athlete Encounters

Every college student encounters some sort of stress when entering college. College students’ main concern in entering college is the academic performance demand. Student athletes’ graduation rates has increased for the past two decades (Melendez, 2006) .May and Casazza (2012) believes that besides academic performance demand college students also deals with school expenses, for instance books, housing, and tuition. College students also find themselves dealing with fitting in and starting brand new relationships with different people. Addition to that they also stress over time management and other hassles they might encounter daily. Student athlete’s deal with a more variety of stress added on what a college student already encounters. They deal with a basic demand for athletic, academic, or social abilities (Pinkerton et al., 1989). Student athletes also experience multiple sport-related issues such as competitive performance demands, injury stressors, or relationship with teammates or coach (Lu, Hsu, Chan, Cheen, & Kao, 2012).Pinkerton et al. (1989) has evidence which supports that college students experience developmental or psychopathological conflict than non- athletes. They also believed that student athletes experience more amount depression and anxiety reaction which is resulted to drug and alcohol addictions. These disorders were mostly found in injured athletes a lot. In Malinkauskas (2010)...
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