College Players Getting Paid

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  • Published : April 10, 2011
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Matthew DelSanto
3/16/11
Analyzing a Text
Amateurs or Exploited Athletes?
In the article titled “College players deserve pay for play,” Rod Gilmore makes his case clear; it’s time for a change in college football. Since college sports originated, the athletes have been considered amateurs that receive benefits through scholarships. Recently, college football has become a multi billion dollar industry, and controversy about whether or not players should get paid has risen from it. Through factually supported claims, clever attacks at the system in place, and intelligent and reasonable requests, Gilmore presents a convincing argument to persuade readers to support college football players being paid.

The article begins by claiming that there is a need for change in college football. That change is players being paid for their contributions to the school. Gilmore goes on to discuss how certain schools tremendously profit from football every year, through numerous sources of revenue. The next topic discussed is the similar number of games college football players play compared to professionals, and the support college presidents give for this. Then Gilmore discusses the benefits that coaches and facilities gain from the games played by the athletes. Gilmore suggests that the players are more valuable than the coaches to schools, and compares the coaches’ salaries to the value of a scholarship at a university. Later, the text discusses how players are being exploited, and provides evidence that many football players aren’t even graduating, which is all that can be gained from their scholarships. Lastly, Gilmore offers a solution to the problem he has with players not being paid, and demonstrates that it would not require much more in costs for universities.

Throughout the article, Gilmore supports his arguments with staggering facts that show he has reason behind his argument. In the second paragraph, Gilmore lists the profits of colleges throughout the...
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