Coca Cola

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Cocoa Cola

It was a prohibition law, enacted in Atlanta in 1886, that persuaded physician and chemist Dr. John Stith Pemberton to rename and rewrite the formula for his popular nerve tonic, stimulant and headache remedy. So when the new Coca-Cola debuted later that year--still possessing "the valuable tonic and nerve stimulant properties of the coca plant and cola nuts," yet sweetened with sugar instead of wine--Pemberton advertised it not only as a "delicious, exhilarating, refreshing and invigorating" soda-fountain beverage but also as the ideal "temperance drink." Though Pemberton died just two years later, five months after his March 24, 1888, filing for incorporation of the first Coca-Cola Co. the trademark he and his partners created more than one hundred years ago can claim wider recognition today than that of any other brand in the world. The Coca-Cola beverage, whose unit sales totaled a 3,200 servings in 1886 ("nine drinks per day" based on the twenty-five gallons of syrup sold to drugstores by Pemberton Chemical Co.), is today called the world's most popular soft drink accounting for billions of servings at restaurants in 195 countries.

In world war two General Dwight D. Eisenhower sent a telegram requesting 10 Cocoa Cola bottling plants for the troops over seas on June 29, 1943. At the beginning of the war Robert W. Woodruff, president of the Coca Cola Company issued an ordered to see to the every man in uniform gets a bottole of coca cola for five cents wherever he is and whatever is costs the company. At the out break of the war coca cola was bottled in 44 countries and additional bottling plants had been shipped aboard to be as close as possible to combat areas in Europe and the pacific. Coca cola did more than lift the spirits of the troops but in many areas it gave local people a first taste of this drink. Which gave them worldwide growth because of the demand.
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