Co-Branding

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Co-branding defines itself a s two or more companies forming an partnership, working together, creating marketing synergy. An example of this includes using a popular brand name ingredient in a brand name product. This is called "Ingredient Co-branding." Another form of Co-branding called "Composite Co-branding involves combining two distinct products together to form one marketable product. This benefits both retailers of said products. The difference between these two terms is the first is one product with a brand name ingredient and the second involves selling two products together. An example of the first term would be pizza advertized using real California cheese. The second would be Digorno Pizza and Toll House Cookies sold in the same package. All four companies enjoy advertizing and marketing by combining forces. This generates sales and saturation in the food market. The real cheese aspect of this touches on the health and organic food craze of today. The charity and community service aspect sounds generous and implying goodwill. The disillusioning truth remains most corporations have little to do with the charity organization they align themselves with. The company might receive a tax break or refund for donating a percentage of sales to a charity but the bottom line for the company remains gaining profits and garnering a charitable image. The exception to this is the Ronald McDonald House. Despite some mold issues in a Tennessee Ronald McDonald House provides a place for the families of child cancer patients to be near their children and helps in the fight against child cancer. This provides a charitable and goodwill image for competitive advantage for McDonalds and help for child cancer patients and their families.
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