Classroom Management Plan

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Classroom Management Plan
Lynn James
MTE/520
March 23, 2013
Pamela Udelhofen

Classroom Management Plan
Personal Philosophy
A classroom management plan is the road map for an effective teaching and learning environment. Classrooms are communities that only succeed when citizens work together, and take responsibility for their actions. It includes the physical environment, routines, student-teacher interactions, volunteers, expectations, rules, responsibilities, and consequences. • Student-teacher interaction – Teachers support students in academic and social learning by remaining calm and consistent in all circumstances. This includes teaching how to take responsibility for behavior, making good choices, and learning from mistakes. Students are more motivated when mutual respect exists (Jones & Jones, 2010). It is important for teachers to demonstrate interest in students. When students believe their teacher cares about them, they respect him or her. • Behavioral expectations – Clear expectations are important for student understanding and success. Discussion of expected behaviors and consequences assist in clarifying appropriate behaviors. Modeling, practicing, and role-playing teach students proper behaviors. Negative behaviors are treated as teachable moments to continually educate students. • Incentive program – Students who exhibit exemplary behavior receive class money toward the class store. Money is only given to students who exceed expected behaviors or achievements. Once a month, they have an opportunity to shop at the school store. • Desk arrangement – It is important for students to know each other, and to know about each other’s experiences, values, and perceptions. Desks arranged in groups foster student to student relationships and collaboration among students. Desks are rearranged throughout the year. • Teacher’s desk and other work areas – Close proximity to students enhances student-teacher relationships, so the teacher’s desk will be as close as possible with a clear walkway to student’s desks. Other work areas such as computer desks and reading club table are easily accessible for smooth transitions. • Wall hangings – Wall hangings include school and classroom rules, expectations, and procedures. One wall includes a word-wall students build and refer to throughout the year. Other hangings include schedules, unit information, inspirational pictures, and general information. • Routines and procedures – Routines and procedures are established, and practiced from the first day of school. They include arrival procedures, attendance, lunch count, bathroom breaks, transitions within the classroom, and transitions outside the classroom, passing out materials, submitting assignments, and end-of-day procedures. • Parent volunteers – Parent volunteers are an important part of the classroom. Students enjoy seeing their parents in the class, and around the school. When parents volunteer, students behave and perform better. It provides opportunities for parents to understand the classroom community. When parents understand the classroom management, they can assist teachers in supporting it. Rules and Consequences

To prevent disruptions, and maintain consistency in a classroom, rules and consequences must be clear and consistent. Some behaviors warrant only saying a student’s name, or walking over to the student. This provides subtle re-direction without embarrassment. Other behaviors require stronger intervention, such as removal from the classroom, teacher-student-parent discussions, or office referrals. Students are capable of demonstrating mutual respect of feelings and belongings, raising hands to be called upon, honesty, cleanliness, paying attention, and hard work. Classroom rules support these capabilities, and are used to promote positive behavior and student success. The first day of school, students and teacher together...
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