Classroom Management

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Running Head: Classroom Engagement and Management Plan

Classroom Engagement and Management Plan

Vincent Bordi
Grand Canyon University: EDU 536
November 16, 2011

This management plan discusses subjects from how teachers conduct themselves to how to implement a management program to their classroom. This comprehensive behavior management plan is beneficial in giving an educator a blue print in leading a classroom to effective learning.

Classroom Engagement and Management Plan
Providing a well-organized and safe learning environment is an important first step in effective teaching. By not only stopping classroom distractions, but also preventing them from starting a teacher can put more energy into lecturing and working with students. Once a well managed classroom is established the main focus in the classroom can turn to learning. Presented in this plan are effective techniques and backgrounds for different aspects of being an educator in the classroom. Presentation to Students While Teaching

The way a teacher presents and conducts their selves to a classroom will determine how students as well as parents view the instructor of a classroom. This can have a number of positive effects on learning and management of the classroom. The educator must not only have legal considerations in how they conduct themselves, but also a deep understanding of ethics and how to apply it. Legal considerations and ethics go hand and hand. When one is ignored the other is usually left behind. Some examples of ethical behavior are being considerate of your student’s feelings, being kind, helpful, honest and treating all students equally (Charles 2011). A teacher needs to learn to teach without using what Glasser calls, “the seven deadly habits,” these include complaining, nagging, threatening and punishing. If an educator does one of these bad habits it may jeopardize the relationship with students. By using positive psychology, an educator can make a positive approach toward student success. When it is figured out what makes the student happy this can be used as a type of intrinsic reward that can improve their view toward school and their teacher (Motivation Theories). Educators also need to be presented as a good communicator, willing to talk with students anytime during or after class. Communication is very important in how students should view their teacher. Behavioral Goals for Students

The goals of all teachers are to have a classroom of compliant students that are ready and willing to learn with little or no distraction. Educators should have nothing less than these expectations, especially for the most disruptive students. In order for students to behave in the manner that is expected there needs to be some form of motivation. Students need something to correlate to good behavior instead of just being told to do so by an authority figure. A good way to achieve this is through a chart that keeps track of all the student’s behavior. When a student behaves well they are rewarded with a sticker next to their name. This is a way for students and teachers to make behavioral goals and also view them over the coarse of the year. It is important for educators to involve students in determining all goals especially something that is so dependant on the student (Motivation Theories). When behavior is not what is expected an educator needs to sit down with the student and figure out the reason. Upon locating the source of the misbehavior a plan needs to be mapped out on how to correct the behavior. The plan must be something that the student will not only find challenging, but also fair and accomplishable. The educator should always keep track of the student’s progress and provide praise and encouragement when they are headed in the right direction. Classroom Conditions Provided by the Teacher

The classroom will be set up in a way that will impact the...
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