Class Management Plan

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Classroom Management and Discipline Plan
Sixth Grade

Classroom Management Plan

Introduction: This is a management plan designed by Amanda Fox Turner targeted for a sixth grade classroom. It is broken into five sections: “Management Vision,” “Management Plan,” “How does it work?,” “The Daily Routine,” and “Sum it Up.” This management plan will be followed by appendices that include examples of items outlined within the management plan, classroom layout, and employment applications.

Section One: Management Vision

Students need to be taught to distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behavior. It is my job as the teacher and leader of the classroom to model good behavior and praise and reward students for following my lead. Using positive reinforcement rather than punishment is most effective in behavior management, however, each class and student is different, and flexibility is the key to managing any group successfully. I am using an intrinsic behavior management plan in my class to make every effort to help my students become self-regulators of their own behavior. As a competent teacher, I know that my main goal is to prepare my students for the day that they leave my classroom. I want my students to learn to monitor their own behavior so they can be successful in their future endeavors. As a caring teacher, I know that it is important to communicate my expectations to my students. Also, if disciplinary measures need to be taken, I will make sure that the student understands why he or she is being punished or not included in a reward. I also know that teachers should be committed each day to helping students become self-regulators of their behavior. I can do this by staying organized and charting behavior as it occurs. I also plan to keep in constant contact with parents, because I know that I must have parental support in order to be successful. The key to keeping my class’s behavior under control is to keep them constantly engaged in learning. I believe that by keeping my student’s minds and bodies stimulated on a regular basis, they will enjoy learning and less behavior problems will occur.

Section Two: The Management Plan
First Day of Class
On the very first day of school, children will be greeted at the door and told to find their name on a seat and begin the assignment on the board. The assignment will be a very basic “Getting To Know You Worksheet: All About Me,” by Teachnology, Inc. which ask the student a little about his/herself. After the allotted time I will then ask the students to interview each other using a “Getting To Know You Worksheet: Student Interview,” by Teachnology, Inc. enabling each student to get to know his or her neighbor. Following those assignments, I will then give detailed information about the classroom management and discipline plan emphasizing positive and negative behavior and the importance of following rules. We will spend the remainder of the first day of school formulating the “Classroom Constitution” in a democratic fashion (rules agreed to and voted upon by the students) and modeling these rules along with the rules I have set forth for bell work, transitions, turning in homework, announcements, and expected hall behaviors. I will also use various icebreaking activities during the first few weeks of school.

First Weeks of Class
Polices and procedures are essential to building classroom structure. As an entire grade, we spend the first week of school teaching the children how to do things the way we expect them done. This is often overlooked or underemphasized. We may expect them to know how to walk in the hall, but they do not. They do not know where to stop, where to line up, which side to walk on, etc. We show them exactly…and they do it over and over until it is correct. If they talk in the hall, we stop and do it again…over and over until it is right. We do this...
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