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Civil Rights Essay

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  • November 30, 2014
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Brianna MartinsMay 18, 2014
US History II (H)Period 3

Civil Rights Essay

The Civil Rights movement has changed conditions and opportunities for African- Americans all across the country, specifically in Newark. Although many feel that even though the Civil Rights Act was put into place segregation and injustice against minorities would still continue, in reality, today the discrimination of these people is subdued. Despite the arguments that the conditions for African-Americans never got better and that the fight for the equality was to violent, the Civil Rights Act ended segregation and gave minorities the chance to vote, gave them a chance to be a part of the government, and also allowed the violent riots and outbreaks to come to an end.

To begin with, the Civil Rights Act along with the Voting Rights Act of 1965 gave a multitude of African- Americans who were once disqualified to vote the right to have their voice heard. After John. F Kennedy’s assassination, Lyndon B. Johnson carried out his promise and signed the Civil Rights Act of 1957 which enlarged federal power to protect the right to vote. However, literacy tests and poll taxes were still in place in certain states so that many blacks would not be able to vote; due to not being able to affording it or because they were uneducated. Due to desperately wanting the unlawful discrimination to stop, on March 21, more than 25,000 African-Americans marched from Montgomery to Selma. During the final rally, Martin Luther King Jr. proclaimed: “The end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live with its conscience. And that will be a day not of the white man, not of the black man. That will be the day of man as man.’’ (Selma to Montgomery March ) After this event took place, Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which eliminated the literacy tests and poll taxes.

In addition, the Civil Rights Act also gave African-Americans the opportunity...
Brianna Martins May 18, 2014
US History II (H) Period 3
Civil Rights Essay
The Civil Rights movement has changed conditions and opportunities for African-
Americans all across the country, specifically in Newark. Although many feel that even though
the Civil Rights Act was put into place segregation and injustice against minorities would still
continue, in reality, today the discrimination of these people is subdued. Despite the arguments
that the conditions for African-Americans never got better and that the fight for the equality was
to violent, the Civil Rights Act ended segregation and gave minorities the chance to vote, gave
them a chance to be a part of the government, and also allowed the violent riots and outbreaks to
come to an end.
To begin with, the Civil Rights Act along with the Voting Rights Act of 1965 gave a
multitude of African- Americans who were once disqualified to vote the right to have their voice
heard. After John. F Kennedy’s assassination, Lyndon B. Johnson carried out his promise and
signed the Civil Rights Act of 1957 which enlarged federal power to protect the right to vote.
However, literacy tests and poll taxes were still in place in certain states so that many blacks
would not be able to vote; due to not being able to affording it or because they were uneducated.
Due to desperately wanting the unlawful discrimination to stop, on March 21, more than 25,000
African-Americans marched from Montgomery to Selma. During the final rally, Martin Luther
King Jr. proclaimed: “The end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live
with its conscience. And that will be a day not of the white man, not of the black man. That will
be the day of man as man.’ (Selma to Montgomery March ) After this event took place, Lyndon
B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which eliminated the literacy tests and poll
taxes.