Cipd Hr Map

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REPORT TITLE: Overview of CIPD’s HR Profession Map
DATE: 18th October 2012

1.0 Introduction
This report has been produced for a new HR practitioner entering into Companies House. This report it outlines The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) HR Profession Map and how this feeds into timely and effective service delivery from professional HR practitioners. The HR Profession Map (HRPM) developed by CIPD is a useful wide-ranging visionary tool of how HR can add value to the organisation it operates in. The map covers skills, behaviours and knowledge that HR people require in order to become a successful HR professional. It also helps to identify areas that people may need to be developed. The map provides support to individuals as they recognise development needs for their career progression which in turn helps the practitioner acquire the knowledge, skills and behaviours to deliver timely and effective HR services to its customers. The information for this report has been collected from the CIPD website and the HR map.

1.1 Findings
The HR Profession Map holds two professional core areas that cover insights, strategy and solutions as well as Leading HR. Insights, Strategy and Solutions is where the professional fosters legitimate insights and solutions, which aid understanding in the business and how it works (or should work), and allows well-defined strategies to be developed and implemented in order to improve things. Leading HR is where a prominent HR professional has active, insight-led leadership; they own, shape and drive themselves, others and activity within the business. Some professionals may not have a role where they lead others but it is still important that they develop and grow in the other two dimensions. The map also shows eight other professional areas of service delivery and information, organisation design, organisation development, resourcing and talent planning, learning and talent development, performance and reward, employee engagement and employee relations these areas are what proficient HR practitioners need to know. The eight behaviours are Curious, decisive thinker, skilled influencer, personally credible, collaborative, driven to deliver, courage to challenge and role model and these show how a HR practitioner should carry out activities. The four bands of professional competence are from 1 to 4 and these show the different levels of experience of practitioners.

1.1.1 Employee Relations
This professional area protects the organisation's relationship with its staff and unions. It should be managed clearly and by relevant employment law. I would relate my role to band 2 as I deal a lot with trade union relations, grievance & disciplinary and health & wellbeing policies. I am driven to deliver, have the courage to challenge and influence in conflict management.

2.0 How a HR Practitioner ensures the Service they provide is timely and Effective

2.1 Three Examples of Different Customers and One Need for Each and Explain how to Prioritise Conflicting Needs.

1. The Line Manager will have a recruitment need from HR. The Line Manager will want assistance with job specifications, job descriptions, job advertisements, sifting, interview questions, interviews, coordination of the administration related to hiring the candidate and they will want this done now. 2. The Trade Union will have a collective bargaining need from HR. Collective bargaining I the process in which the union and senior management meet in partnership to discuss terms/conditions, wages, benefits, hours and other every day working issues. These meetings can be very stressful and can sometimes end with neither party agreeing. Great importance is placed upon reaching an agreement as to fend off any further ramifications such as industrial action. 3. The Employee will have a need from HR to facilitate the grievance procedure. The employee...
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