Cinematography: Film and Movie

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Today, the movie industry has become a huge moneymaker in the entertainment business. You cannot turn on the television without seeing advertisements for the next big blockbuster film. While most of the films these days entertain with amazing special effects or raunchy comedy, there are still films that thrive because of great acting, directing, and editing. Three films that I believe would be great examples of the way these aspects can cause a film to excel are ?Any Given Sunday?, ?The Cell?, and ?Almost Famous?. ?Any Given Sunday? shows how, by using editing, a movie can portray an intense situation realistically. In ?The Cell?, color is used to differentiate between how we see things in reality and how things are seen inside our heads. ?Almost Famous? is a great example of the ways that sound and acting can enhance the quality of a film.

Al Pacino, as run-down head coach Tony D?Amato, and Jamie Foxx, as energetic quarterback Willy Beaman, star in this behind the scenes look at the conflicts that occur inside a modern day professional football team. While the backstabbing and stubbornness of people involved in a football program are greatly exaggerated in this movie, I chose it because of its portrayal of the on-the-field action. Having played football in high school, this is the first film that has been able to effectively capture the speed and intensity through the movie screen. The movie gives you the emotions of every type of person involved in the football game. Every view from the players on the field to the coaches on the sidelines to the fans in the crowd and watching on television is shown. Quick cuts of slightly blurred panning shots along with close-up shots of the intense looks on players faces many times give the viewer the feeling that they are involved in the play themselves. The movie also geniously uses a combination of true speed and slow motion scenes to allow the viewer to experience both the speed and intensity of the moment...
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