Cigarette Must Be Banned

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12/07/2012
Cigarettes Must Be Banned
Everyone knows the dangerous impacts of using cigarettes. However, not many people know how huge the issue is. In America, an enormous number of people die every year due to cigarette use. In particular, in 1990, approximately half of the preventable deaths in America were caused by cigarette use (Tobacco and Health). According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette use contributes more to the causes of deaths in America than the combination of alcohol, cocaine, crack, heroin, homicide, suicide, fires, car accidents, and AIDS (“Tobacco and Health”). Cigarettes are still allowed to be used because of their huge profits for the governments. However, cigarettes must be banned because they are seriously harmful not only for the smokers, but also for surrounding people, and the environment. In spite of the fact that using tobacco is the leading cause of dangerous diseases and illnesses, including cancers and cardiovascular disease, more than twenty percent of Americans and Canadians still smoke every year (Bellver, Melo and Soares). The impacts of tobacco are larger than smokers could imagine. Tobacco smoke contains more than two hundred toxic chemicals. More seriously, sixty-nine of those chemicals are classified as carcinogens (Kushihashi). This reliable statistic proves that a common disease caused by tobacco use is cancer. Over 150,000 deaths were caused by tobacco related cancer in 1990 (“Deaths Caused by Smoking in the U.S., 1990”). It is clear that using tobacco in the long term affects the smokers’ health directly. Due to the dangerous effects on their health, the more the smokers use tobacco, the sooner the smokers die. Among those smokers, many of them are teenagers. Although teens are prohibited from smoking, the number of teens smoking keeps increasing. In particular, while over twelve percent of teens smoked in 2008, the percentage soared to 20.2 percent in 2011 (Splete). The health of these people is put in danger more since they began smoking at a young age. Teens who smoke do not think about the health problems that they may encounter in the long run. Instead, they focus more on their social status, and what others may think of them in the future. Thus, since laws cannot prevent teens from smoking, the governments have to prevent teens from being exposed to cigarettes. In addition, another type of smokers who are not supposed to smoke is pregnant women. Surprisingly, over thirteen percent of Americans continue smoking during pregnancy ( Bellver, Melo and Soares). It is obvious that the cigarette smoke does not only affect the pregnant women, but also their babies. Those women possibly know the impacts of cigarettes on them and their babies. However, since tobacco is addictive, many people who use cigarettes have trouble quitting. Thus, cigarettes are not simply a problem for people who smoke, but also for the people around them who do not want to smoke. Since smoking can easily spread in the air, cigarettes are harmful for not only smokers, but for those around them. For years it had been thought that smoking only affects smokers, and nonsmokers were not at risk at all. However, after years of research, it had been found that second hand smoke from the cigarettes causes much harm to nonsmokers. In particular, people who have no choice to breathe the second hand smoke are highly at risk of diabetes and obesity (Klatz). In research that was done with 6300 participants, Theodore C. Friedman and colleagues from Charles R. Drew University (California, US) found out that second hand smokers tend to have type-2 diabetes (Klatz). In addition, second hand smokers also possibly have high blood sugar when they have fasting blood work done (Klatz). In addition, many people have breathing problems such as asthma, so they may suffer from attacks due to cigarette smoke. Breathing is hard for those people; it is...
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