Chronic Disease Risk Assessment

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Chronic Disease Risk Assessment

Diabetes is a chronic lifelong disease where there are high traces of sugar in the blood. A diabetic individuals pancreas secrets an insufficient amount of insulin or does not use the insulin efficiently. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas that enables the body to use glucose for energy. Diabetes is caused by too little insulin, resistance to insulin or both. Diabetes is the most common disorder of the human hormone system; there are three forms of diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is often referred to as insulin dependent diabetes or juvenile-onset diabetes. This form of diabetes usually develops in young adults, teens and children. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s immune system destroys its own insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Individuals with type 1 diabetes have to take insulin medication for the duration of their life.

Type 2 diabetes is known as non-insulin dependent diabetes or adult-onset diabetes, and occurs when the body stops recognizing the insulin secreted by the pancreas. When there isn't enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, sugar can't get into the body's cells. When sugar builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body's cells are not able to function properly. Gestational diabetes is another form of type 2 diabetes with conditions characterized by high blood sugar levels which are first recognized during the later stages of pregnancy.

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, as are any risk factors. This type of disorder is usually passed on genetically. There is no prevention or cure for type 1 diabetes. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: genetics, obesity, heart disease, sedentary lifestyle, and ethnicity. African Americans are ranked to be more susceptible to be diagnosed with diabetes than any other race. Many women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. There is no known cure for diabetes. Treatment...
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