Christian Elements in the King Arthur

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Through the modern eyes, history of Western civilization, from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Age of Discovery, is seen through Medieval literature. Ten centuries of history are noticed, involving individual products of heroic periods and their unique era of culture. Acknowledging Medieval literature illustrates a society of heroic knights, led by a luxurious king, charging into battle, romantic connections between royalty and a common person, and new discoveries being found. As well as times characterized by feudal activity, along with the Catholic Church holding an influencing control of society, and placing heavily on the laws they laid. The Church ruled simultaneously with the government, controlling every aspect of the Medieval hierarchy. The Church affected rituals and moral principles of the people, as well as write their own stories to enlist to their ideologies. Literature links with the delegated character of the Medieval past, such as the Arthurian legend, influencing the interpretation of the period. King Arthur is recognized as legendary king of Britain, whose central figure spreads abroad from British history to centuries of Western literary works. He is known for leading British soldiers against more powerful, invading Saxon armies. A product of Celtic mythology, he is subjected to have led Britons to a decisive victory at Mount Badon, killing 960 enemies in one charge (Ruud). Though, his kingship and throne to Camelot was subjected to Christian elements. From what is seen through Medieval history by literature, Christianity is relevant to the Arthurian legend. King Arthur is supported by an honorable accord of knights at his Round Table. Also, quest for the Holy Grail is signified in King Arthur’s story as the chalice from of which involves Christ. The love affair between Guinevere, his queen, and Lancelot, his beloved friend and champion knight, places biblical references to the Book of Genesis, as of the serpent in God’s garden....
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