Choses in Life

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Wali 1 Amad Wali

Prof. Shimkin
EN 102
11-10-2012

In the play, The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams and the short story, Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin, we find two characters faced with very different situations and choices, requiring both to take a decision to either accept the conditions as they exist or accept the responsibility to change them. “Tom Wingfield, Amanda winfield’s son. And the narrator of the play. A poet with a job in a warehouse. His nature is not remorseless , but to escape from a trap he has to act without pity.” He struggles with choosing between his own personal dreams versus accepting the reality of his families situation. “Look! I’ve got no thing, no single thing in my life that I can call my OWN! Everything is… yesterday you confiscated my books! “. Tom feels confined because of Amanda’s restrictions on his life. “House, house! Who pays rent on it, who makes a slave of himself to”. As a provider of the family Tom uses hyperbole to emphasize the overwhelming sense of imprisonment he feels. "Listen! You think I’m crazy about the warehouse? [He bends fiercely toward her slight figure.] You think I’m in love with Continental Shoemakers? You think that I want to spend fifty-five years down there in that – celotex interior! with—fluorescent—tubes! Look! I’d rather somebody packed up a crowbar and battered out my brains—than go back mornings! I go! Every time you come in yelling that Goddamn ‘Rise and Shine! Rise and Shine!’ I say to myself, ‘How lucky dead people are!’ But I get up. I go! For sixty-five dollars a month I give up all that I dream of doing and being ever! And you say self—self’s all I ever think of! Why, listen, if self is what I thought of,...
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