China Revolution of 1911

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 309
  • Published : February 12, 2006
Open Document
Text Preview
The Road to Communism

The revolution of 1911, lead by Sun Yatsen, which resulted from a need for salvage from the destructive rule of Prince Chun, the father of the infant Emperor, Pu-Yi, was a very important event in the historical development of twentieth century China. It led to the abdication of the Qing Emperor, and placement of Yuan Shikai as the President of the Republic. The revolution, which sparked from a revolt at Wuchang in 1911, tipped off the majority of the provinces to proclaim their independence from the Qing Regime. Although the new Chinese Republic was initially able to avoid a disastrous civil war, peasant uprisings, and foreign intervention it lacked a sufficient replacement to the former imperial autocracy. Yuan's attempts to create an autocratic regime reminiscent of the past and the lack of a central government were impeding the growth of post-revolution China.

Yuan's death in 1916, resulted in a China that would be plagued by warlords, civil war, coups, and additional foreign occupation. No single power emerged as a strong leader. The republic revolution of 1911 was successful in eradicating the imperial autocracy that had defined Chinese history, but it left future of the nation in a very precarious position. It was inevitable that a new leadership would emerge with radical new ideas. I feel that the Republican Revolution was extremely influential in setting up the playing field for a future power struggle between the Nationalists and Communists. The inability of the Revolutionary League to develop a stable regime, opened China's doors to new ideas and forms of leadership.
tracking img