Childhood Obesity Position Paper

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Childhood Obesity: Who is really responsible?
Homer G. Brown, Jr.
English 112
Professor Currie
August 12, 2012

Outline
I. Introduction
A. This argument defends the parents, reduces the thought of all of the responsibility belonging to the parents, and highlights other responsible parties, namely the responsibility of the school system and their implementation of school lunch programs and vending machines.

II. While parental control is needed in aiding in the childhood obesity problem, this is not the only issue.

A. Reports suggested that parental restriction of child eating was associated with increased food intake by children.” (Faith, M. et.al, 2004)

B. While parental control is needed, restricting diets can create an increase in eating habits, thus more body weight.

C. The change in eating habits regulated by parents may not be consistent with those habits performed in other locations.

III. While parents have a responsibility to teach their children good, healthy eating and feeding them as such, children spend more of their eating time at schools or daycare facilities that follow the same guidelines and offer the same habits.

A. Most children that attend public schools are recipients of free or reduced lunches. In the United States, fiscal year 2009, more than 31.3 million children received their lunches through the National School Lunch Program; more than 219 billion lunches have been served since 1946. (http://www.fns.usda.gov, retrieved August 8, 2012)

B. Although several states are required to monitor school lunch programs, many school districts believe that their current economic state encourages them to find ways to generate revenue for things needed in the other school programs. This may include selling junk foods in vending machines and serving pre-packed lunch items.

C. The increase in selling items has contributed to the childhood obesity problem.

IV. Childhood...
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