Childhood Obesity

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Childhood Obesity
Chamberlain College of Nursing
Dawn M. Greene
NR448 Information Systems in Healthcare
Professor Rebecca Burhenne
Spring Session B – 2010

Introduction
The research topic attempts to examine if socioeconomic status affects the prevalence of elevating obesity rates in adolescents. Obesity is a condition that is indicative of a” high proportion of body fat that causes a negative effect on your health” (Dahms, 2008). The most common causes is eating too much and moving around too little. Genetics, family history, age, and sex are also risk factors that can lead to obesity. “Obesity can be linked to the diagnosis of high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease” (Dahms, 2008). The best defense against obesity is diet modification, increase in physical activity, and exercise. To diagnose obesity a calculation called the body mass index (BMI) is used. As referenced by eMedTV (n.d.), weight (in pounds) divided by height( in inches) squared is then multiplied by 703. A BMI >25 <30 is equivalent to being overweight. A BMI ranging from 30-39 is equivalent of obesity. A BMI of > 40 results in morbid obesity. The PICO format helps to shape the clinical question by using the key search words: adolescent obesity, low socioeconomic status, and middle socioeconomic status. The acronym PICO identifies “P” as the patient and problem – adolescent. “I” represents an intervention/indicator - low socioeconomic status. “C” is a comparison of lower and middle socioeconomic status.” O” is the outcome – obesity. The research question formulated using the PICO format is: Is obesity more prevalent in adolescents with lower socioeconomic status than with adolescents from upper /middle socioeconomic status.. My approach to gathering pertinent information needed to find evidenced based practice and peer review articles/journals related to my research topic was to access the Pub Med Medline site:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ . I viewed the...
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