Child Labour

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Name: Tammy (Nhan) Mai
Instructor: Chris Barrett
Date: December 7, 2010

According to internationally accepted rules, regulations, laws, morality, and ethics, child labour is unacceptable, and child labour should be not legalized. This paper records the results of research on child labour issues in newly industrialized nations and third-world countries, and discusses how companies currently make use of child labour. Child labour is unacceptable because it is immoral and unethical, and should be illegal. Over the past few years, child labour has been a major issue. There are a number of controversies, debates, and arguments over whether child labour should be legalized or not. There are two sides of the argument on this subject. One point of view is that child labour should be legalized. Some people support legalization of child labour. They argue that child labour is good because it gives children who live in poverty opportunity to earn a living, gives poor families a source of income, and can help companies save costs. Today, in developed countries child labour is not a realistic option; however, it is a common issue in newly industrialized nations such as China, India, and Pakistan. Many children in these countries are forced to work because of poverty; however, not all countries that allow child labour are wrong, not all companies that use child labour are bad, and not all workplaces where children are employed are dangerous and dirty. Some have shown recent improvements in child worker pay and the working conditions of children. From one point of view, poverty, allowing child labour can benefit both poverty-stricken families and the companies wishing to employ children. On the other hand, some people argue that no matter how extreme or severe poverty is, children should not be allowed to work because it is morally wrong, and child labour should be illegal in every country. Child labour is considered an abuse. In many developed countries, child labour is considered unacceptable for both emotional and physical reasons. Some companies hire children and force them to work long hours under dangerous, and unsatisfactory conditions. . Child employees receive no social benefits and usually are poorly paid, especially in view of the work they do. Therefore, from this point of view, child labour is completely wrong, unethical, and should be against the law. Child labour is unacceptable because it goes against basic human rights and accepted morality, ethics and laws. Definition of child labour

Universal agreement on the definition of child labour is lacking. My own definition of child labour is a situation where a child (a person under eighteen) is working under conditions that are harmful to the child, and the child receives unreasonably low pay for his or her work. Any company or household that employs children under these conditions is using child labour. It is important to understand precisely about what harmful means. My definition of harmful with respect to child labour is work that deprives a child of opportunities which are beneficial for the child and his or her development. Furthermore, harmful also includes activities where the cost to the child’s future welfare is greater than the current welfare derived from the child’s participation in these activities. It also includes situations where a child is better off if he or she does not participate in these activities (Kis-Katos and Schulze). Child labour conditions

The working conditions in countries where child labour is used are less than ideal. Children are exposed to toxic chemical hazards. They have to work for long hours in poor conditions for a minimum wage. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), approximately 250 million children between the age of five and 14 work in developing countries. Today, the use of child labour is heavily concentrated throughout Asia, Africa, and Latin...
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