Child Labour

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  • Topic: Slavery, Labour movement, Political campaign
  • Pages : 16 (3893 words )
  • Download(s) : 80
  • Published : March 9, 2013
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|CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOUR | |Child Labour | |Group Members: | |Jermaine Tomlinson - 0701685 | |Kemisha Gordon - 0905547 | |Kevin Tinglin - 1006443 | |Rhannon Daley - 0900165 | |Sheldon Moffat - 0800246 |

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TOPIC PAGE

Introduction……………………………………………………………………..3

Background on Child Labour…………………………………………….…..…4-5

Existing campaigns on Child Labour in Jamaica………….……………….……6-8

Research Tool……………………………………………………………………9-10

Overview of Marketing Campaign………………………………………….…..11

Marketing Campaign Plan:

-Objectives……………………………………………………………....13

-Target Audience………………………………………………………..14

-Marketing Mix………………………………………………………….15-17

-Feedback & Evaluation…………………………………………………18

Reference………………………………………………………………………..19

Appendices

Questionnaire……………………………………………………………20-22

Findings of questionnaire……………………………………………..…23-27

INTRODUCTION

This research offers an insightful look into the issue of child labour in Jamaica. It provides a comprehensive background to the issue of child labour and evaluates the findings of previous campaigns that are developed for reducing or eliminating the problem. A questionnaire was then utilized to gather individuals’ perception of and attitude towards prevailing issue. Based on the findings, a marketing campaign was then developed to address current issues on child labour. The marketing plan includes objectives, target audience, and marketing mix. Finally, a feedback and evaluation was drawn to give an overall view of the importance of this campaign.

BACKGROUND OF CHILD LABOUR

Child labour is work that harms children or keeps them from attending school. It usually involves characteristics such as violation of a nation’s minimum age law; threatens children’s physical, mental or emotional well-being; intolerable abuse (e.g. slavery, child trafficking, etc.); preventing school attendance; and using children to undermine labour standards. Around the world, growing gaps between rich and poor in recent decades have forced millions of young children out of school and into work. The International Labour Organization estimates that 215 million children between the ages of 5 and 17 currently work under conditions that are considered illegal, hazardous, or extremely exploitative. Of this estimated 215, approximately 114 million (53%) are in Asia and the Pacific; 14 million (7%) live in Latin America; and 65 million (30%) live in sub-Saharan Africa. Underage children work at all sorts of jobs around the world, usually because they and their families are extremely poor. Large numbers of children work in commercial agriculture, manufacturing, mining, and domestic service. Children in commercial agriculture can face long hours in extreme temperatures, health risks from pesticides, little or no pay, and inadequate food, water, and sanitation. This may result in child labourers suffering from extremely high illness and injury rates in underground mines, opencast mines, and quarries. Researchers have found children working mining operations such as mining gold in Colombia, charcoal in Brazil and El Salvador, chrome in Zimbabwe, and diamonds in Cote d’Ivoire; among much others. Millions of children are involved in work that, under any circumstance, is considered unacceptable for children, including the sale and trafficking of children into debt bondage, serfdom, and forced labour. It includes the forced recruitment of children for armed conflict, commercial sexual exploitation, and illicit activities, such as producing and trafficking drugs. These types of child labour...
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