Chicken Pox

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Chicken Pox

By | November 2012
Page 1 of 10
Course Title: Epidemiology

Lecturer: Mrs. Marilyn Procope-Beckles

Group Members:

Khadisha Daniel Vernella Joefield

Nathalie Mohammed Rania Gardiner

Stacey John Denise Lashley-Agard

Britney Dumas Natalia Roberts

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Table of Content

Introduction……………………………………………………………………….Page 3

Signs and Symptoms……………………………………………………………...Page 4

Causes of Chickenpox……………………………………………………………Page 5

Sources of Chickenpox…………………………………………………………..Page 6

Mode of Transmission……………………………………………………………Page 7

Incubation and Possible Complications…………………………………………Page 8

Infectivity of Chickenpox………………………………………………………...Page 9

Prevention of Chickenpox………………………………………………………..Page 10 - 11

Control of Chickenpox……………………………………………………………Page 13

Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………Page 13

Bibliography……………………………………………………………………….Page 14 - 15

Introduction

Chickenpox (varicella) is a common illness that causes an itchy rash and red spots or blisters (pox) all over the body. Chicken pox is an extremely transmittable disease easily noticeable by the particular rash that it causes, which happens mainly in kids. Most people will get chickenpox at some point in their lives if they have not had the chickenpox vaccine.

Chickenpox can cause problems for pregnant women, newborns, teens and adults, and people who have immune system problems that make it hard for the body to fight infection. Chickenpox usually isn't a serious health problem in healthy children. But a child with chickenpox needs to stay home from school. And you may need to miss work in order to care for your child.

After you have had chickenpox, you are not likely to get it again. But the virus stays in your body long after you get over the illness. If the virus becomes active again, it can cause a...