Chicago Black Sox Scandal, Teapot Dome Scandal, Gangsters and Police Corruptions

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Chicago Black Sox Scandal
Baseball, like many other things in the early nineteen hundreds, was quickly becoming popular. Almost every American at was a fan of baseball, which meant that any gamblers who were excellent at guessing could make a very large sum of money by picking the winning team. Some people, however, did not feel the need to guess, but simply rig the game, which is how the Chicago Black Sox Scandal of 1919 came about. It started out with a group of gamblers who came up with the idea, one used to be a pitcher, so he had some connections with baseball players. There were eight players involved, which was plenty for the black sox to throw the game. Each of the players involved were offered $100,000. With so much money offered, more people became involved in the scandal, and soon word began to spread. Because of all the scandalous talk, all of the players that were involved in the scandal were banned from the sport forever.

Teapot Dome Scandal
The Teapot Dome scandal was one of the many scandals of President Warren G. Harding, and the most controversial. The Teapot Dome scandal happened in 1921 in a place located near Casper, Wyoming where there were many reserve oil reserves that were exclusive use for the U.S Navy. The reason for the name “Teapot Dome” was due to the shape of the oil reserves, which were shaped like domes, and a strange rock formation in the shape of a teapot that was located nearby. The scandal started when the authority of the oil reserves were transferred from the U.S Navy to the Interior department with the consent of Edwin Denby, who was secretary of the Navy. Senator Albert B. Fall of New Mexico, was in charge of the leases for the oil wells, and favored private parties. Harry F. Sinclair, president of the Mammoth Oil Company, had received the rights to the Teapot Dome through Fall in 1922. Fall also made it possible for Edward L. Doheny, who was his friend and prominent in the Pan-American Petroleum and...
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