Chemical Reactions Lab

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Classifying Chemical Reactions

Purpose: The purpose of this experiment is to observe a variety of chemical reactions and to identify patterns in the conversion of reactants into products. Apparatus:
Bunsen or lab burner-Test tube clamp
Butane safety lighter - Test tube rack
Evaporating dish - Wash bottle
Forceps or crucible tongs- Wood Splints
Heat resistant pad
Litmus paper
Pipets
Spatula
Test tubes
Materials:
Ammonium carbonate, 0.5g
Calcium carbonate, 0.5g
Copper chloride solution, 4mL
Hydrochloric acid, 4mL
Magnesium ribbon, 2-4 cm strips
Phenolphthalein indicator, 1 drop
Sodium hydroxide solution, 1mL
Sodium phosphate solution, 1mL
Water
Zinc, mossy, or zinc shot, 1-2 pieces
Introduction: In this lab we will classify different chemical reactions. Classifying chemical reactions allows us to predict what chemical reactions will occur when different substances are mixed. Procedures:

Reaction 1)
1.Obtain a 3-4 cm strip of magnesium metal ribbon. Hold the piece of magnesium with forceps or crucible tongs and heat the metal in a lab burner flame. 2.When the magnesium ignites, remove it from the flame and hild it over an evaporating dish or a Pyrex watch glass until the metal has burned completely. Let the product fall into the evaporating dish. 3.Turn off the lab burner and observe the properties of the product in the evaporating dish. 4.Record observations in the data table.

Reaction 2)
5.Using a beral-type pipet, add about 2mL of 1 M hydrochloric acid solution to a small test tube. 6.Obtain a 2-3 cm strip of magnesium metal ribbon and coil it loosely into a small ball. Add the magnesium metal to the acid in the test tube. 7.Carefully feel the sides of the test tube and observe the resulting chemical reaction for about 30 seconds. 8.While the reaction is still occurring, light a wood splint and quickly place the burning splint in the mouth of the test tube. Do not put the burning splint into the acid solution. 9.Record observations in the data table.

Reaction 3)
10.Obtain a clean and dry test tube and place a small amount of ammonium carbonate into the test tube. 11.Use a test tube clamp to hold the test tube and gently heat the tube in a lab burner flame for about 30 seconds. 12.Remove the test tube from the flame and place a piece of moistened litmus paper in the mouth of the test tube. Identify any odor that is readily apparent by wafting the fumes toward your nose. 13.Test for the formation of a gas: light a wood splint and insert the burning splint halfway down into the test tube. 14.Record observations in the data table.

Reaction 4)
15.Place a small amount of sodium carbonate in a clean and dry test tube. 16.Using a beral-type pipet, add about 1mL of 1 M hydrochloric acid to the test tube. Feel the sides of the test tube and observe the reaction for 30 seconds. 17.Quickly light a wood splint and insert the burning splint about halfway down into the test tube. Don’t allow the burning splint to contact the reaction. 18.Record observations in the data table.

Reaction 5)
19.Using a beral-type pipet, add about 2mL of copper chloride solution into a small test tube. 20.Add 1-2 pieces of mossy zinc or one piece of zinc shot to the test tube and observe the resulting chemical reaction. 21.Record observations in the data table.

Reaction 6)
22.Using a beral-tyoe pipet, add about 2mL of 0.5 copper chloride solutions into a small test tube. 23.Using a fresh pipet, add about 25 drops of 0.5 M sodium phosphate solution to the test tube. 24. Record observations in the data table.

Reaction 7)
25.Using a beral-type pipet, add 20 drops of 1 M sodium hydroxide solution into small test tube. 26.Add one drop of phenolphthalein indicator to the test tube and mix the solution by gently swirling the tube. 27.Using a clean beral-type pipet, add 1M hyrdpchloric acid solution one drop at a time to the...
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