Chemical Hazards

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Occupational safety and health, Personal protective equipment, Risk
  • Pages : 14 (3564 words )
  • Download(s) : 58
  • Published : January 7, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
he2012
Muhammad Ferdauz
[Type the company name]
1/1/2012
Ensure A Safe Workplace

GUILFORD TRAINING CENTRE PTE LTD & HOLMESGLEN INSTITUTE (HOSPITALITY)

RESEARCH

Course Name :DIPLOMA OF HOSPITALYTY
Course Code :BSB51107 Diploma of Management
Session Code :DGM51CHFM0
Unit Name :Implement & Monitor Workplace Health, Safety & Security Procedures Unit Code :SITXOHS004A
Assessment Title :Ensure A Safe Workplace
Teacher Name :MsLinaShaharan
Assessment Value :Competency Achieved (Tick) YesNo Due Date :17 January 2013
Distribution Date :
Student Name :Wong Sheng er
Student ID :S7721487I
Date :

CONTENT PAGE
PART – A
Employer Case
Chemical Hazards 4
Introduction4
CONTROL OPTIONS5
CONTROL OF SIGNIFICANT HAZARDS5
CONTROL OF OTHER HAZARDS7
Roles and Responsibilities9
MANAGEMENT CONTROLS10
Hazard Control Plan11

PART – B
Employees Case
10 Type of Hazards12
HIERARCHY OF HAZARD CONTROLS14
Chemicals Likelihood 16
Chemical Consequences16

REFERENCE18

Chemical Hazards
Chemicals can affect the skin by contact or they affect the body either through the digestive system or via the lungs if air is contaminated with chemicals, vapor, mist or dust.
There can be an acute effect, i.e. the person is affected immediately, or there can be a chronic effect, i.e. the person is affected in the medium to long term due to the accumulation of chemical or substances in or on the body. INTRODUCTION

Hazards in a workplace are controlled by a combination of “local controls” Specific to a hazard, and “management controls” for ensuring that these are implemented and remain active. THIS IS AN IMPORTANT PRINCIPLE TO REMEMBER.

The implementation of controls to fix a specific hazard, e.g. chains to prevent gas cylinders toppling over, or hearing protectors to reduce exposure to noise, must be supplemented by management activities to ensure they are being implemented, that they are adequate, and that they remain effective. The mechanism for the control of a hazard may not necessarily be a physical one, but may be a rule or practice designed to reduce the risk from the hazard. It is necessary to ensure that once hazard controls are put in place they stay in place and are used, and it is also necessary to provide a feedback mechanism for ensuring whether or not the controls are adequate and responsibilities are Understood by all.

CONTROL OPTIONS
When a hazard has been identified and assessed as needing some control measure, then the next process to go through is the selection of which option is required. The final choice of an option is based on factors such as the potential severity of harm posed by the hazard, the likelihood of injury or illness occurring, the cost of control measures, or whether it has been identified as a significant hazard.

It is important, however, to LOOK AT ALL OPTIONS before making a decision, even though the identified hazard may already have some controls in place. CONTROL OF SIGNIFICANT HAZARDS
Hazards that are assessed as “significant” present such a degree of risk that the Act requires a more formal approach in dealing with them. The primary aim is the elimination of significant hazards if practicable. Sections 8, 9 and 10 of the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 contain specific requirements for the control of significant hazards. These sections require that the following steps are to taken once significant hazards have been identified in an organization:

1. Significant hazards to employees are to be eliminated where practicable. 2. If this is impracticable, those hazards are to be isolated. 3. If this is also impracticable, all practicable steps must be taken to minimize the likelihood that the hazard...
tracking img