Checkpoint: the Nature-Nurture Issue

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Checkpoint: The Nature-Nurture Issue

PSY/240
March 8, 2013

Checkpoint: The Nature-Nurture Issue
It is flawed to ask how much of a particular behavior is because of genetics and how much is because of experience. According to Pinel, (2011), this is because it is based on the idea that genetic factors and experimental factors combine in an additive manner. Meaning it takes parts of both genetics and experience instead of just one over the other. Genetics plays a role because it can affect a person’s ability to handle emotional experiences. Genetics could be responsible for inherited genes involving anger issues and the ability to control them. However, I believe that behavior is more so related to how a person is raised and the morals, ethics, and values their parent or guardians have instilled within them. Furthermore, the person’s behavior would also be formed as a result of the judgments given by their peers.

It is appropriate to separate the contributions of genetics and experience when measuring the development of differences among individuals because each individual will carry different genes and are raised under different circumstances. While both of these factors affect individual behaviors, these factors are comprised of different combinations that really cannot be judged because these combinations are endless. In the end, an individual’s behavior is more than likely to be restricted or controlled by consequences that they feel as a result of their experiences or actions.

References

Pinel, J. P.J. (2011). Biopsychology (8th Ed.). Retrieved from Boston M.A: Pearson.
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