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Chapter Review on the Political Economy of Permanent Crisis in the Philippines by Walden Bello

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  • Feb. 2013
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The Political Economy of Permanent Crisis in the Philippines By: Walden Bello
(Book Review: Chapters 6 & 7)
In a world where competition gets tougher and tighter, it does not pay to play around and settle with typical and average situations. It is not valuable that we settle for anything less. Hence, it is necessary that we improve on what we got and acquire some assets that we do not possess. However, looking on the Philippine context, statistics prove that we lag behind some countries; more disappointingly, behind some countries which were once at the bottom before. How did this happen? History may give the answers but what matters is how the government approached the dilemmas the country was facing few years back.

Chapter Six of the book, “The Anti-Development State: The Political Economy of Permanent Crisis in the Philippines” by Walden Bello talks about “unsustainable development.” Sustainable development; what could this mean? As defined in the book, “sustainable development” is the development that meets the needs of present generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The chapter then discussed about environmental concerns in relevance with the economic policies. Economic activities cannot be separated from the environment since we get resources from the environment in order to produce goods or services that we use up for economic purposes and to supply the necessities of people. Walden Bello takes up the mining and logging industry when both were at their peak. On mining industry, the government was almost over-the-top generous on offering various incentives to multinational corporations for them to extract the country’s vast mineral resources. However, the side-effect of this, on the other hand, was that the indigenous people living within the area of the mine sites involved were eventually out of the government’s concern, consideration, and protection. The situation sets the fact that the...