Change management

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Change management

By | April 2011
Page 1 of 4
Change Management Models
Priyank Parekh (1010534)
University Canada West
Professor: Dr Eli Sopow
Change Management (MBA 513)
18th February 2011
Introduction
In this paper, the main focus is on the three models of Change Management i.e. Kotter’s 8-stage model, Lewin’s Planned Change Model and Positivist Model. I have also mentioned the strengths and weakness of Kotter’s 8-stage model. “In any change effort, managing the change process is clearly important. For most of the organizations, the much bigger challenge is to lead the change” (Leban & Stone, 2008). The leader of the organization is responsible to organize the change and communicate this to the rest of the organization. For a organization to be successful in long run they have to experience the changes at different points in their development. Following are the three change management models, and we will discuss them in detail. 1. Kotter’s 8-stage model

2. Lewin’s Planned Change Model
3. Positivist model
Kotter’s 8-stage model
The eight stages of Kotter’s model are as:
1. Establishing a sense of urgency: This is the first step in the model. This step is necessary to make people understand that the current situation is more dangerous. The people working in the organization should know that there are good opportunities which help to strengthen the company. The positive side of creating urgency is that the employees in the organization will be motivated in bringing the change in the organization. The negative effect of creating urgency will be that employees will not consider change as priority and change will fail. 2. Creating a guiding coalition: In an organization change efforts starts with one or two people. And it should grow to include more people who believe that changes are necessary. The guiding coalition for the change needs to have 3 to 5 people leading the effort. “Involving respected leaders in the coalition will pay greater dividends” (Kotter,...