Change and Continutie

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Between 500 CE and 1500CE changes and continuities in interregional commerce in the Eurasian World occurred. The Silk Road connected South Asia, Western Asia, and South Asia with Europe. The “road” was used for trading good such as silk, porcelain, and other luxuries. Not only was it used for trading material goods, but it was also used for trading religions, skills, and knowledge. It also passed along diseases. Some changes that occurred were that classical empires collapsing and new empires began to rise, and trade in the Indian Ocean became more regulated in 1500CE than before in 1400CE. A continuity that occurred was the Indian Ocean trade remained unregulated from 700CE through 1400CE. Due to the collapse of the classical empires in 500CE and the rise of the Byzantine, Abbasid, and Tang Empires in 700CE, trade declined then grew. When the classical empires collapsed, trade declined because due to the lack of government following the decline of the classical empires, protection could not be granted for trade and trade routes could not be repaired. Due to these reasons, trade and travel became dangerous. When the Byzantine, Abbasid, and Tang empires began to rise, trade grew again because Tang rulers set up military garrisons to protect the trade done through the Silk Road, the Byzantine empire’s central location on the Mediterranean Sea allowed trade to flourish, especially in the capital of Constantinople, and in the Abbasid empire Muslim merchants spread improved irrigation in the region, which led to increases in food production and population. Because of the three empires rising, trade was able to be successful again after the fall of the classical empires. During the years of 700CE through 1400CE a continuity of unregulated Indian Ocean trade continued in Eurasian trade. The Indian Ocean represented the world’s largest sea-based system of communication and exchange. The alternating wind currents that blew predictably eastward during the summer months...
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