Cfrb Radio Station Essay

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History of CFRB

CFRB is Toronto’s oldest and longest running radio station. It was founded by Roger’s communication giant Ted Roger’s in the year 1927, and is still going strong to this date. Even through many programming changes, countless numbers of different hosts, and several different formats, they have still managed to remain a powerhouse in the Toronto market. The history of the station is very interesting, and is the reason radio is the way it is to this date.

In the year 1925, the demand for a new and more powerful way of receiving and transmitting radio was needed. Ted Rogers, founder of CFRB invented the first batteryless radio receiver, which was a revolution at the time. The machine was designed with the purpose of using an ordinary electric current, and converting it into an energy source that could transmit radio. To demonstrate the power of this device, Rogers put forth an experimental radio station in the year 1927. The station was called “9RB” and would launch in February of that year for three hours. Within the three hours of the scheduled programming, there was an opening speech from Attorney General W.H price, and a live performance of Jack Arthur Conducting an orchestra from within the city. That night, “9RB” became CFRB, standing for “Canada’s First Roger’s Batteryless”. The station originally began on the frequency of 1030kHz, but moved to 960kHz in the March of the same year. At the time the station shared frequency with CKGW, a Christian Radio station. As time progressed, it would be clear that CFRB was dominating the signal, and CKGW would move to another frequency. February 19, 1927 marked the starting point of a historic powerhouse radio station. Over the years that CFRB has been running, they have seen many strong talents pass over their airwaves. One of the earliest talents that they hired was Wes McKnight. Wes McKnight began in the station as their lead sportscaster. He joined the station in 1928, just one year after it began, and did sports broadcasts for over thirty years. He was the voice of the Toronto Argonauts during his time period at the station, and covered all of the Grey Cup games that took place. He hosted such shows as ``Sports Commentary`` and conducted many sports interviews for the station. He would later go on to become program for station. Another notable talent for the station was Jim Hunter. He was the stations first full time newscaster, and delivered the news every day on the station until his death in 1949. Hunter was best noted for his coverage of the collapse of the Moose River mine in Halifax. He updated the public every 20 minutes about the collapse, for a total of 129 hours. He continued his updates until the 3 men trapped were saved, 3 days later. One of the most esteemed and profound announcers to be with CFRB was Wally Crouter. He joined the station in 1946, and stayed with the station for 50 years, until his retirement in 1996. He always had something to keep the listener`s attention, and remained interesting by having special guests on the show, and attempting to ease the listener into their day, with informative but less harsh news and information. He did this by staying away from the more racy subject such as sex, politics, and religion. One of his most esteemed moments in the radio stations history, was when he covered Hurricane Hazel devastating Southern Ontario. Even though thousands of people were left homeless and hundreds dead, Crouter still managed to make it to the station by 6 am, and begin his broadcast day. He helped thousands of listeners maintain hope, and gave constant updates on to where help could be found, and which offices and schools were closed etc. Crouter became known as a family man, and became a very prominent figure in CFRB`s history. When he retired on November 1, 1996, it was announced as Wally Crouter day, and a huge retirement party was thrown in his effort. The station took a hard hit that day, and it was some time before...
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