Cesar Chavez

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A lot of civil rights movements were nonviolent. There are many examples of these great leaders like Mohandas K. Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr and Cesar Chavez all used nonviolent methods to make a difference. Although all these amazing leaders made a difference none of them made such a great impact to my life like Cesar Chavez did. Cesar Chavez is from Yuma, Arizona but his parents were from Mexico. Cesar E. Chavez was an American farm worker, labor leader, and civil rights activist who co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers. Chavez as a child often moved a lot with his family to look for work. His parents were a big influence on his principles on hard work, the importance of education, and respect. I think what connected me the most to him was the fact that he was Hispanic like me. I’ve read his biography and it states his family use to work in fields. I have heard many stories from my uncles and grandfather about working in the fields. From what they tell me they worked long hours in harsh conditions. They would work from sunrise to sunset, constantly bending to grab the fruit or vegetables. It was a lot of physical labor which caused them to have back problems now. Chavez fought for the legal rights of farm workers, and for clean drinking water in the fields, as well as the right to have access to use bathrooms. These little changes helped my family a lot. Cesar also formed Cesar Chavez's movement inspired the founding of two Midwestern independent unions: Obreros Unidos in Wisconsin in 1966, and the Farm Labor Organizing Committee in Ohio in 1967. Former Union Farmer Workers organizers would also found the Texas Farm Workers Union in 1975. He also led varies protests. An example would be his protest against pesticide. His protest led to many changes in the fields. Cesar's motto, " Si se puede!" ("Yes, it can be done!"), has a lot of meaning. Its the motto of the United Farm Workers. In 1972, during...
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