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This is a semester project (Research Report) regarding a baby food product named Cerelac of Nestlé. It starts with an introduction about Nestlé followed by the history of Nestlé. It gives a briefing about all the brands of Nestlé.

This report also includes the marketing mix of the product. All the 4P’s of marketing mix for the product has been discussed and explained to reveal the significance of its product, pricing, placing and promotional activities.

BCG matrix has also been included in this report to know about the current standing of brand in local culture.

Segmentation and target marketing will help to understand the criteria of Nestlé marketing for the specific product.

In the end, there are some recommendations for the company to enhance their profitably according to our research. After that, report has been concluded.

Today, Nestlé is the world leading Food Company. Nestlé headquarters is in Switzerland. Its international R&D network supports the products made in more than 500 factories in 86 countries. The Nestlé factories are operating in the region of:


Being a company dedicated to food from the beginning, Nestlé remains sensitive to culinary and eating habits, and responds to specific nutritional problems, whilst also setting and matching new trends such as growing out-of-home consumption and caring about the well being of its consumers.

Meaning Of Nestlé
Henri Nestlé endowed his company with the symbol derived from his name. His family coat of arms, the nest with a mother bird protecting her young, became the Company's logo and a symbol of the Company's care and attitude to life-long nutrition. The Nestlé nest represents the nourishment, security and sense of family that are so essential to life.


1866 -1905
In the 1860s Henri Nestlé, a pharmacist, developed a food for babies who were unable to breastfeed. His first success was a premature infant who could not tolerate his mother's milk or any of the usual substitutes. People quickly recognized the value of the new product, after Nestlé's new formula saved the child's life, and soon, Farine Lactée Henri Nestlé was being sold in much of Europe.

1905 - 1918
In 1905 Nestlé merged with the Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company. By the early 1900s, the company was operating factories in the United States, Britain, Germany and Spain. World War I created new demand for dairy products in the form of government contracts. By the end of the war, Nestlé's production had more than doubled.

1918 - 1938
After the war Government contracts dried up and consumers switched back to fresh milk. However, Nestlé's management responded quickly, streamlining operations and reducing debt. The 1920s saw Nestlé's first expansion into new products, with chocolate the Company's second most important activity

1938 - 1944
Nestlé felt the effects of World War II immediately. Profits dropped from $20 million in 1938 to $6 million in 1939. Factories were established in developing countries, particularly Latin America. Ironically, the war helped with the introduction of the Company's newest product, Nescafe, which was a staple drink of the US military. Nestlé's production and sales rose in the wartime economy.

1944 - 1975
The end of World War II was the beginning of a dynamic phase for Nestlé. Growth accelerated and companies were acquired. In 1947 came the merger with Magi seasonings and soups. Crosse & Blackwell followed in 1950, as did Findus (1963), Libby's (1971) and Stouffer's (1973). Diversification came with a shareholding in L'Oréal in 1974.

1975 - 1981
Nestlé's growth in the developing world partially offset a slowdown in the Company's traditional markets. Nestlé made its second venture outside the food industry by acquiring Alcon Laboratories Inc.

1981 - 1996
Nestlé divested a number of businesses1980 / 1984. In 1984,...
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