Ceo Analysis - Clarence Birdseye

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I. Personal Background
Clarence Frank Birdseye II was born on December 8, 1886 in Brooklyn, New York. He was the sixth of nine children of Clarence Frank Birdseye I and Ada Jane Underwood. Birdseye spent a short time at Amherst College before dropping out in 1908 due to financial constraints. His father Clarence Birdseye I was an attorney and his mother Ada Jane Underwood was a homemaker. Clarence Birdseye died on November 7, 1956 of a stroke at the Gramercy Park Hotel, he was 69 years old and he was cremated and his ashes scattered at sea off Gloucester, Massachusetts. II. Professional Background

After dropping out of college Birdseye moved out west to work with the United States Agriculture Department as a ‘assistant naturalist’, in essence he killed of coyotes to protect livestock. From 1912 to 1915 he worked in Newfoundland and his interest in froze food grew quickly. The Inuit taught him how to ice fish in thick ice and when those fish were caught and frozen quickly when thawed they tasted much fresher than anything he had tasted before. He began to understand the concepts and difference between ‘slow freezing’ and ‘fast freezing’ and that ‘fast freezing’ was much more beneficial to maintaining the nutrients of the food and to satisfying the customer. He knew then that this idea would be lucrative. The timeline of how the Birdseye Company unfolded is below: * 1922 – Birdseye conducted fish freezing experiments then created his own company “Birdseye Seafoods Inc.”. * 1924 – Birdseye Seafoods Inc. went bankrupt due to lack of consumer interest. * 1924 – Birdseye developed a completely new process for commercial quick freezing and created a new company “General Seafood Corporation” * 1925 – GSC implemented a double belt freezer which Birdseye own the US patent for. * 1927 – GSC extended the quick freezing process beyond seafood into meat, poultry, fruit and vegetables. * 1929 – Birdseye sold his company and patents for $22 million to...
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