Central Irony

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Animal Farm Central Irony Paragraph Essay
In Animal Farm, by George Orwell, the central irony is how the pigs turn into human like figures after they were supposed to be the opposite. At the beginning of the story, there was a set of seven commandments. The pigs broke every single one of them by the end of the novel. They walked on two legs, they were not comrades to anybody except their own kind, and they wore clothes, drank alcohol, slept in beds, and killed animals. But the most important one that the pigs broke was that all animals are equal. By the end of the story, all of the seven commandments were turned into “all animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others” (Orwell, 118). This meant that the pigs were above all of the other animals, and they received more rights and power. None of the animals could ever protest against this because of the loyalty of the sheep. When somebody even tried to protest, the sheep would begin a cry of four legs good, two legs bad that eventually turned into “four legs good, two legs better” when the pigs started walking on their hind legs (Orwell, 118). Another example of the pigs expressing their similarities to humans was when Napoleon arranged Boxer to be taken off the farm by the horse slaughterer. Killing the animals when they are useless was one of the main reasons that they kicked Mr. Jones off of the farm. They felt that the animals should live their intended life span and not be slaughtered. Another very important example of the pigs being like humans was when they invited other humans over for a tour of the farm and for dinner. At dinner, the pigs were all drinking alcohol (which was against the seven commandments), and talking with the humans. After the dinner they were playing cards together, and all of the other animals were watching. They noticed that they all “looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which” (Orwell,...
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