cell reproduction

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Mark Kirksey
SCI/230
June 15, 2014
Sharon Allen

COMPARISION OF
MITOSIS AND MEIOSIS
Meiosis has unique events that occur during meiosis I. Prophase I is where duplicated homologous chromosomes pair along their lengths. Crossing over happens with homologous (non-sister) chromatids. In metaphase I, pairs of homologous chromosomes are aligned at the center of the cell. During anaphase I, sister chromatids of each chromosome stay together and go to the same pole of the cell as homologous chromosomes separate. At the end of meiosis I, there are two haploid cells, but each chromosome still has two sister chromatids.

MITOSIS
Features of a Mitosis Cell
Cell Reproduction and repair of body
Asexual
Occurs in all organisms
Identical in genetic make up
Crossing over can not occur
No pairing
Number of divisions 1
Produces 2 daughter diploid cells

STAGES:
Interphase
Prophase I
Metaphase I
Anaphase I
Telophase I
Prophase II
Metaphase II
Anaphase II
Telophase II

MEIOSIS
Features of Meiosis Cell

Sexual reproduction
Sexual
Occurs in humans, animals, plants and fungi
Genetically different
Mixing of chromosomes can occur
Can pair homologues
Number of divisions 2
Produce daughter cells 4 haploids
Chromosome number reduced by half

STAGES:
Interphase
Prophase I
Metaphase I
Anaphase I
Telophase I
Prophase II
Metaphase II
Anaphase II
Telophase II

ORGANISM THAT USE MITOSIS

Organisms use mitosis when they
divide into to new cells or reproduce
to repair damaged cells

ORGANISM THAT USE MEIOSIS
Organisms use meiosis when reproduction is needed

CELLS THE UNDERGO MEIOSOS
• Meiosis is essential for sexual reproduction it occurs in some eukaryotic cells. Meiosis does not occur in prokaryotes and
archaea, which reproduce by asexual cells production process

IMPORTANT PHASES OF MITOSIS/MEIOSIS

IF MEIOSIS/MITOSIS STOPPED
We could say goodbye because
everything on the planet that is a
living organism would perish,

REFERENCE
• David, N. (2009). The Differences between
Mitosis and Meiosis. Retrieved from http://
www.sciences360.com/index.php/t hedifferences-between-mitosis-and- meiosis-212004/

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