Cell Phone

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INTRODUCTION
Cell phones are a tool of convenience. Having a cell phone now makes people reachable in almost any location as long as there is good reception. This makes individuals easier to contact. Ease of access is not the only benefit of cell phones today though, as cell phones offer features that have many other benefits. Many kids and teens today have their own mobile phones to use for social, family, and professional purposes. Mobile phones are equipped to send/receive phone calls and text messages."Smart" phones or PDAs and other devices also enable you to access the Internet, take/send, photos/videos, play games, listen to music, use a calculator, alarm clock, and calendar, not to mention the thousands of apps that offer a growing array of services. Text messaging has many functions, even those with a typical 160 character limit. By sending one text message to your Twitter account, you can immediately update all of your followers (those who have elected to receive mobile updates). Or, you can vote on your favorite American Idol. You can also send a text message to GOOGL (56656) with search queries, such as looking up the definition of a word. Many teens use a mobile phone as a part of a family plan, where the bill is sent to one person in a household or family. However, teens are able to procure their own mobile phones without committing to a contract by purchasing a prepaid phone. The function of mobile phones in our lives is likely to keep expanding, as mobile phone companies are looking to sell more goods and services through the phone, where the buyer would pay for the goods along with the monthly mobile phone bill. Teenagers have previously lagged behind adults in their ownership of mobile phones, but several years of survey data collected by the Pew Internet & American Life Project show that those ages 12-17 are closing the gap in mobile phone ownership. The Project first began surveying teenagers about their mobile phones in its 2004 Teens and Parents project when a survey showed that 45% of teens had a mobile phone. Since that time, mobile phone use has climbed steadily among teen’s ages 12 to 17 – to 63% in fall of 2006 to 71% in early 2008. In comparison, 77% of all adults (and 88% of parents) had a mobile phone or other mobile device at a similar point in 2008. Mobile phone ownership among adults has since risen to 85%, based on the results of our most recent tracking survey of adults conducted in April 2009. The mobile phone has become a primary mode of socializing for teens and they will often avoid contact with peers that don't have mobile phones, according to a study by Context. And almost everyone, including those whom the Context study considers moderate cell-phone users, felt anxious during the "deprivation" phase of the study that required them to give up their phones for a few days. Mobile phone use has several potential costs: financial, academic, social, and health. Aside from using more minutes than allocated in your mobile phone plan, extra text messages (both sent and received) can quickly add to your bill. Some schools limit or restrict the use of mobile phones. Schools set restrictions because of the use of mobile phones for cheating on tests, harassing other people, causing threats to the schools security, and facilitating gossip and other social activity in school. Some teen’s text messages so much (200+ texts/day) that they have developed physical symptoms, Texting Teen Tendonitis (TTT). So much texting can lead to pain in the hands, back and neck soreness from poor posture while texting, impaired vision, and, possibly, many years down the line, to arthritis. One study found that teenagers who excessively use their mobile phone are more prone to disrupted sleep, restlessness, stress and fatigue. Another found that mobile phone addiction can result in psychological disorders. Because mobile phones emit electromagnetic radiation, concerns have been raised about cancer risks that may...
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