Cause and Effect of World War I

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World War 1 erupted in 1914. World War 1 had many countries involved but not all of them entered at the same time. There were three sides to choose from at the beginning of World War 1. One option was the Central Powers which included Germany, and Austria-Hungary, and were later joined by Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire who were neutral at first then joined the Central Powers. There were the Allies which were made up of Ireland, Great Britain, France, Belgium, Russia, Montenegro, and Serbia. The Allies were later joined with Portugal, Italy, Greece, and Romania who left the Neutral nations. The Neutral nations were made up of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Netherlands, Switzerland, Albania, and Spain. There were many causes for the outbreak of World War 1. One cause of World War 1 was militarism. Militarism is the glorification of one countries military. Many countries were getting this militarism idea because they dreamed of war being glorious. Many young men dreamed of walking down the streets playing there trumpets along with the rest of the military and having people cheer for them as they marched by. Many people would soon find out that war is not good. Another thing that goes along with militarism and the outbreak for World War 1 was the arms race. Many countries wanted to have the best armies and navies with the best weapons. The worst competition was the naval rivalry between Britain and Germany. To protect its vast overseas empire, Britain had built the world's most respected navy. When Germany began to obtain colonies, it began to build a strong navy also. A result of this rivalry led to a war between the two which was one cause of World War 1. A second cause of World War 1 was imperialism. Imperialism is the domination by one country of the political, economic, or cultural life of another country or religion. Economic rivalries were a big cause of World War 1. The British felt endangered by Germany's fast economic growth. By 1900, Germany's new, modern...
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