Case a: Hrm Incident: Hr After a Disaster

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After Hurricane Rita struck Lake Charles, in southwest Louisiana, on September 24, 2005, many businesses wondered if they would ever return to their former selves. Massive destruction was everywhere. Lake Charles, know for its large and beautiful oak and pine trees, now had the job of removing those downed trees from homes, businesses, and lots. You could see for miles through what used to be thick forests. Huge trucks designed for removing massive tree trunks were everywhere. While driving down a street, downed trees could be seen stacked two stories high waiting to be picked up. The town grew rapidly in size because of the large number of debris and repair crews working on recovery operations. The noise created by chain saws could be heard from daylight until dark. The sounds of hammers were everywhere as homeowners scrambled to get their roofs repaired. Often repair crews would just find an empty lot and set up tents for the night because all motels were full. Traffic was unbelievably slow, and it appeared as if everyone was attempting to get on the road at the same time. Just driving from Point A to Point B could often be quite an adventure. As might be expected in conditions such as these, accidents were numerous. Often police did not have the resources to ticket every fender bender so unless there were injuries, insurance cards were exchanged and the police went on to the next accident. Assessment 1: Week 3 – Answer Both CASES and any TWO answer 5 marks * 4 = 20 Marks

Months after Hurricane Rita struck, large and small businesses were still frantically trying to find workers so they could start up again. It appeared that every business in the town had a “Help Wanted” sign out front. Individuals who wanted a job could get one and could command a premium salary. Wal-Mart, known for remaining open 24 hours a day, could only stay open on an abbreviated schedule. It even bussed in employees from Lafayette, Louisiana, 70 miles away, each morning and returned...
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