Case Workbrain

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Introduction
Workbrain Corporation is on the cusp of a dramatic expansion. David Ossip, the President and CEO, has hired Eric Green to manage Workbrain’s corporate development plan. In other words, Green’s task is to bring Ossip’s vision to life. Workbrain’s current organization state lacks structure, focus, and functional direction. The company is performing well but the coming expansion will require more extensive infrastructure. The external environment can be characterized by building pressure from investors, clients, and the marketplace—all driven by the innovative characteristics of their product and industry. Workbrain management currently prefers generalists rather than specialized employees. A key resource for Workbrain is the technical, industrial, and managerial experience possessed by the executives.

Traditionally companies require five basic parts to perform key subsystem functions: top management, middle management, and technical core, with the technical and administrative support staff facilitating the operation of the company (See Appendix 1). In Workbrain’s scenario, the top management and technical core boundaries have been blurred due to the hands on nature and the technical background of management (See appendix 2). Eric Green’s task is to develop a system for Workbrain to grow and thrive in. This will define the boundaries between functional areas and top management, and establish a framework in which Workbrain is free to evolve.

Analysis
With the competitive nature of the technology industry, Workbrain needs to establish infrastructure fit to accommodate the coming expansion. The company’s investors are placing significant pressure on the executives to meet both time and revenue deadlines. There is a very slim margin of error in the coming months. In this way, Eric Green’s organizational strategy is critical to the success of the organization.

In stark contrast with the rest of the organization (described below), Eric Green is prepared to initiate an expansion/recruitment plan for Workbrain. Green understands that David Ossip has hired him to guide the corporate development of the company. Green’s prior experience has generally been in well-developed and strategically organized companies. “Thinking big” is what he was hired to do; and Green intends to follow suit. Eric noted a variety of things required: •Strategic recruitment plan

Defined job roles and descriptions
Organizational structures
Implement the expansion strategy at all levels including: oBusiness plan
oVision
oGrowth strategy
Upper management supporting the recruitment strategy
Develop commercial partnerships and client relationships

Most members of the organization, with the exception of Green, are of the opinion that employees with a generalized skill-set are most valuable to the company. Green on the other hand is insistent that more specialized positions will increase Workbrain’s output capacity. Clearly defining segments of the business will bring Workbrain closer to a traditional and more efficient organizational configuration (See appendix 1). Personal Readiness

Green is more than ready to begin integrating these concepts as soon as possible. However, he recognizes that maintaining the creative corporate culture throughout the process of expansion will be difficult. In particular, further segmenting the roles of individuals tends to diminish communication and the free flow of creative information. Retaining employees will also prove to be a challenge as the size of the office increases exponentially. Organizational Readiness

Ossip and the other more technically-inclined managers originate from an entrepreneurial background. This explains their skepticism of more definitive departments and personnel. In most start-ups, the business hinges on the wide skill sets of only a select few people. Workbrain, however, has outgrown the infant stages of commercialization....
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