Case Study Mis1

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TRƯỜNG ĐẠI HỌC NGÂN HÀNG TP. HỒ CHÍ MINH KHOA CÔNG NGHỆ THÔNG TIN BỘ MÔN HỆ THỐNG THÔNG TIN QUẢN TRỊ 

BÀI TẬP TÌNH HUỐNG HỆ THỐNG THÔNG TIN QUẢN TRỊ NĂM HỌC 2011 – 2012

LƯU HÀNH NỘI BỘ

TP.HCM - 2011

BÀI T P TÌNH HU NG - MÔN H TH NG THÔNG TIN QU N TR - H Đ i h c chính quy

CASE STUDY 1.1

LETTERS TO THE DEAD AND OTHER TALES OF DATA DERELICTION
A retailer once launched a targeted customer marketing campaign that had but one tiny flaw: a fifth of the intended recipients were dead. The letters for them – addressed, with impeccable accuracy, to ‘Dear Mr Deceased’ – urged them to ‘wake up’ to what the company had to offer. This mailshot mishap is part of a nightmarish list of corporate data blunders drawn up for the Financial Times by Detica, a business and information technology consultancy. It includes the tale of the insurance company that was intrigued to discover the majority of its customers were astronauts – until further investigations showed that lazy sales staff eager to close deals had simply chosen the first option available on the pull-down menu of jobs. Whether grotesque or hilarious, the bloopers have a unifying theme that any business ought to note. As companies develop ever more sophisticated ways of using data to help win new business and cut costs, the risk is that they pay too little attention to the quality and organization of the underlying raw information. At best, this damages efficiency; at worst it can destroy relationships and hamper efforts in crucial areas such as fighting fraud. ‘Firms have always seen the data as the water that flows around the system’, says Philip Powell, professor of information management at the University of Bath’s School of Management. ‘They have invested a lot in the system – the water pipes – without really recognizing the value of the water’. It is a problem that has come increasingly into focus as technological advances have opened up new methods of collecting, combining and storing data. Managers have greater quantities of information than ever before, but are in some ways less well-informed because they do not order it well. Bill gates, Microsoft chairman, claimed last year that almost a third of information workers’ time was spent searching for data, costing $18,000 per person per year lost productivity. Those hundreds of forgone hours are in part a consequence of the explosive growth of the space available for information storage. While a bulging filing cabinet is a daily reminder of the need for data discipline, electronic file dumps can grow to gargantuan proportions unseen. They are monitored and cleansed only by computer experts, rather than by information management professionals applying a librarian’s discriminating eye. Information is sometimes duplicated or out of data. A common fault is that companies lack a single docket on each customer, supplier or employee, instead spreading information across files held in numerous places by many departments. In the absence of a master copy, updating is done piecemeal, generating horrors such as the ‘Dear Mr. Deceased’ letters. Trang 1 / 53

BÀI T P TÌNH HU NG - MÔN H TH NG THÔNG TIN QU N TR - H Đ i h c chính quy

Bridget Treacy , partner at Hunton & Williams, the law firm, says companies are sometimes ignorant of basic facts about information they hold, who has access to it, and what it is being used for. ‘If people are not paying attention to it, of course there are going to be blunders’, she says. A more suitable snare facing companies is their failure to consider the various possible meanings of the information they gather. The classic example is the sales spike that causes marketing people to sniff an opportunity, when a risk manager would scent danger. For instance, a customer starting a credit card splurge might receive an offer for an upgraded deal, when a better response would be to launch an investigation into card theft and fraud. In other cases, companies embarrass themselves because...
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