Case Study 1

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Li-Hsien Chen
09/16/12

Case Study 1
The Springfield Nor’ easters : Maximizing Revenues in the Minor League

1. Critically analyze the research undertaken by Larry Buckingham, Nor’ easters Marketing Director. Discuss if you feel the objectives, questions asked, sample chosen, and method utilized were appropriated and why they were or were not. What type of questions would you have added to the survey and why? 2. -------------------------------------------------

What do you consider to be the key findings of both the League Sports Association Survey and the research survey conducted by the Nor’easters? Discuss any potential biases that might exist. Comment on what Buckingham learned about a prospective customer profile, pricing, and single ticket versus season-ticket packages from both.

The sport marketing research plan that Buckingham tried to do is well organized especially in this short time stress. However, it may not fully accomplish and still need some more steps to achieve the goal. The purpose and problem of the research is simple and clear. Buckingham want to know how many people would come to see and how much to charge them. There are many of key findings that Buckingham can make a good use of it. According to the League Sports Association Survey, over 73% residences are willing to attend baseball game who having an income ranging from$22,500 to $75,000. Base on the statement, Buckingham used non-probability sampling method. Trying to focus on the most possible group that becoming the game attenders. I think the problem is only one existing finding and Buckingham just used it as model. It seems to me that he trying to prove the result from the previous found but there is no novel or creative finding appear. It's a pity that he couldn’t use this time to find something new and more inspiring result, Because of time stress and budget consideration, Buckingham chose postcard and internet survey to finish the research instead of mail survey. But in the end, approximately just 4% of postcards were return to the office and totally 625 responses (add to internet response) were tabulated is just not enough samples for me to make critical decision. According to statistic calculation, the confidence interval of survey is about 94~95% that still can make it more reliable and validity if Buckingham gathered moreinformation. Blesch noted that Minor League teams (unlike Major League Baseball) won-lost records appeared to have little to do with attendance; mediocre teams that provided a high entertainment value often had very high attendance. What Blesch’s note is so right to me because you have nothing to do with your roster and team’s competition. It’s all in charge of Major League. Sometimes, the most productive or talented player may get promote to higher level of minor league teams as soon as they have breakout performance. It’s graceful if your team has good prospect and future superstar. But you just cannot put all eggs on it. How to use advertisement, promotion to attract local residences attending games and make them believe it would be great experience no matter the host team win or lose. Another key finding is how much money residents are willing to pay for a ticket. Range from $10-$14. And no matter how cheap the tickets are, concession will make up for it. No less than 39% team’s profit make of concession sales. One MD who Buckingham has talked with said it even makes more than half team’s revenue. It seems that Buckingham should pay more attention on concession sales. On the questionnaire, Buckingham can put some questions, like what type of snack, beverage and food sports fans hope to have in the games; what kind of souvenir and team’s goods that fans are willing to buy it. It’s all about gaining the profits and fans’ attending. Asking one question that how much do fans expect to spend on concession is too general to me. The potential fan base which Buckingham described by...
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