Carper's Pattern of Knowing

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HEALTH SCIENCE JOURNAL ®

VOLUME 5, ISSUE 4 (2011)

The Value and Significance of Knowing the Patient for
Professional Practice, according to the Carper’s Patterns of Knowing
Marianna Mantzorou 1, Dimos Mastrogiannis 2
1. RN, MSc, Lecturer, Department of Nursing Β΄, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Greece
2. RN, MSc, Lecturer, Department of Nursing, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Lamia, Greece
Abstract
Background: Τhe scientific value of man relies upon an extension of a continuous effort of mankind to explain the nature of man. The core issue in nursing is man within his entirety. The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the Knowing the Patient for Professional Practice, according to the Carper’s Patterns of Knowing. Method and material: In this paper the four patterns of knowing according to Carper will be analysed. According to these patterns, a description of the meaning and strategies of " knowing the patient will be made. Finally the significance and value of it will be discussed, with specific referance to: skilled clinical judgement, involvement, patient advocacy, and clinical learning about larger populations. CINAHL and Medline were the basic data bases u sed for this literature review.

Results: The process of knowing encompasses empiric, aesthetic ethic and personal elementsOn the other hand, " knowing the patient‖ acquires two broad dimensions: a) knowing the patient's patterns of responses and b) knowing the patient as a person. Patterns of responses are essential components for problem solving.

Conclusions: The process of knowing the patient appears to be an integration of the four patterns that Carper identified. Moreover, knowing the patient was found important for clinical judgement personal involvement, patient advocacy and clinical learning. In order to enhance the ability of nurses to integrate the different patterns of knowing the person, educators should review the current teaching strategies to develop cognitive, intuitive, experiential, and personal knowledge.

Keywords :patterns of knowing, nursing knowledge, personal knowledge, empirics, intuition, esthetic knowledge
Corresponding author:
Mantzorou Marianna,
13, Tassopoulou str.
Ag. Paraskevi, 15342,
Tel: 210 6398958, Mobile: 6937849980,
E-mail: mantzorou@teiath.gr

The Value and Significance of Knowing the Patient for Professional Practice, according to the Carper’s Patterns of Knowing

pp: 251-261
E-ISSN:1791-809X

251
www.hsj.gr

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HEALTH SCIENCE JOURNAL ®

VOLUME 5, ISSUE 4 (2011)

Introduction

M

ichael Polanyi once wrote that the
existence of plants and animals was
not discovered by botanists and
zoologists, and the scientific value of these
sciences relies upon the development of
man's pre scientific interests in nature.1
In the same way, Martha Rogers
states that man was not discovered by
nursing and its scientific value relies upon an
extension of a continuous effort of mankind
to explain the nature of man.2 She continues
saying that the core issue in nursing is man
within his entirety.
Nursing's effort to know man is "a
weaving of threads of conceptions,
perceptions, remembrances, and reflections
into a fabric of meaning". This threads may
be coming from the nursing science or other
sciences, arts life, or experiences. However,
as the weavers, nursing creates a unique
process and product.3
The writer will refer to this process of
knowing which as described by Carper
encompasses empiric, aesthetic ethic and
personal patterns.4 According to these
patterns, a description of the meaning and
strategies of " knowing the patient will be
made. Finally the significance and value of it
will be discussed, with specific referance to:
skilled clinical judgement, involvement,
patient advocacy, and clinical learning about
larger populations.
Carper's patterns of knowing.
According to...
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