Carpentry

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  • Topic: Drill, Drill bit, Saw
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  • Published : March 10, 2013
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Fastening tools

screw driver
plier glue gun
wrench

These are all hand tools:

Hammer - driving & pulling nails

Combination square - marking 45 degree angles, measuring depths, setting power saw blade heights

Nail set - setting nail head so that they may be puttied & sanded for smooth surface

Cross-cut saw - for cutting wood across the grain

Rip saw - for cutting woods with the grain

Block plane - for removing small thicknesses of & smoothing wood

Screwdrivers - phillips & flat blade

Framing square - for figuring & marking cutting angles on wood

Chalk line - used with powdered chalk to make long, straight lines 

Ladders - for reaching & working safely at heights

Carpenter's rule - a folding ruler, usually 6' long

Utility knife - for scoring & cutting

Level - for determining the level & plumb of walls & other work

Coping saw - for making coping cuts in mouldings

Bit & brace - hand powered drill for drilling wood, preferred by some cabinet makers

Rasp - a rough file for cutting down wood

Nails - for fastening wood

Fastening
* Hammers, nails, screws, screwdriver, staples, staple guns, mallets and tacks are examples of carpentry tools that fasten pieces of wood together permanently. Both hand and power tools are available in this type of carpentry tool. Fastening tools not only permanently fasten pieces of wood together but also fasten other objects like handles and hinges to a piece of wood.

- Drills –
A good hand drill will make your holes quickly and effortless. Hand drill are still used today but now are usually replaced by the electric or the cordless drill, The old ones come in two types, the hand drill and the brace. Hand drill

The drill has a gearing mechanism, so when you make a full revolution on the handle the drill bit will rotate much faster. It is to be used with twist drill bits and counter sinking bits. You use Hand drills for making pilots holes and countersinking. Brace

The brace allows you to make much larger holes than the drill. The handle gives a lot of leverage and allows you slow accurate holes. It is to be used with auger bits and similar designs, the brace only rotates are fast as the user operating it, but as auger bits require a slow speed Braces are ideal. The auger bit will screw in to the wood automatically when used, so you don’t have to force the brace. The auger bit will tunnel in to the wood automatically when it is being turned.

1 - Hand Drill 2 - Twist Drill Set 3 - Centre Bit 4 - Auger Bit 5 - Adjustable Expansive Bit 6 - Ratchet Brace

- Tools for Holding –
When you work with timber, it needs to be secured, whether it’s being worked or glued. Obviously wood comes in different sizes and there are different tools for holding your work securely in position. Securely supporting your timber while working greatly reduces any risks that could happen, also if you’re gluing timber your want it to accurately set in the right place, so good clamps and vices are essential. G Clamps

You will get G Clamps in a range of different sizes. General you can buy clamps between 1in (25mm) – 12in (300mm). You’re find clamps great for being portable and supporting small work. Speed Clamp

These are tools from the trade. It’s light weight and allows you to clamp with speed, they are very portable and a great all-rounder, but they do not give as muck pressure when gluing timber together as the G Clamp. Sash Clamps

You will hold great sizes of wood together. They are great for the use of gluing up frames and large pieces of work. The sash clamps have a slid able bar to allow quick set up. Vices
Your work shop should not be with out one.
There are two types, an engineer and woodworkers. The engineers have steel holding jaws and sits on top of your bench, making it unsuitable for wood work. The woodworkers vice has wooden protective jaw inserts to hold your...
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