Career Motivation

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Abstract

Career Motivation is usually examined among young or mid-career workers. The older worker is left alone. Unfortunately, in an environment in which the older person represents the fastest growing segment of the labor force, this critical resource is being frittered away. Examination of current practices suggests a large portion of older workers are persuaded by their employers' actions that their careers are at an end. Alternatives to extend and increase this group's Career motivation are discussed. Research exploring the underlying processes involved in successful mentorships has been lacking. In the present study, the roles of Career motivation explanatory factors were examined. Career motivation mediated the relationship between career mentoring and performance effectiveness. Contrary to prediction, only marginal support was received for career self-efficacy as a mediator between mentoring and indicators of career success. Career motivation is unique in that it was the first to reveal linkages between mentoring, career self-efficacy and Career motivation. Theoretical and practical implications of results are discussed.

Index

TOPICSPAGE NO.
What is Career?
What is motivation?
What is Career Motivation?
types of Career motivations
Identifying Career Motivation
Example of Career Motivation worksheet
Ways of Career motivation
Career motivation at work

References

What is Career?
Career is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as a person's "course or progress through life (or a distinct portion of life)" By the late 20th century, a wide range of choices (especially in the range of potential professions) and more widespread education had allowed it to become possible to plan (or design) a career: in this respect the careers of the career counselor and of the career advisor have grown up. It is also not uncommon for adults in the late 20th/early 21st centuries to have dual or multiple careers, either sequentially or concurrently. Thus, professional identities have become hyphenated or hybridized to reflect this shift in work ethic. The progress and actions taken by a person throughout a lifetime, especially those related to that person's occupations. A career is often composed of the jobs held, titles earned and work accomplished over a long period of time, rather than just referring to one position.

While employees in some cultures and economies stay with one job during their career, there is an increasing trend to employees changing jobs more frequently. For example, an individual's career could involve being a lawyer, though the individual could work for several different firms and in several different areas of law over a lifetime. See also career ladder.

What is motivation?

Motivation is the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal and elicits, controls, and sustains certain goal directed behaviors. It can be considered a driving force; a psychological drive that compels or reinforces an action toward a desired goal. For example, hunger is a motivation that elicits a desire to eat. Motivation has been shown to have roots in physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and social areas. Internal and external factors that stimulate desire and energy in people to be continually interested and committed to a job, role or subject, or to make an effort to attain a goal. Motivation results from the interaction of both conscious and unconscious factors such as the (1) intensity of desire or need, (2) incentive or reward value of the goal, and (3) expectations of the individual and of his or her peers. These factors are the reasons one has for behaving a certain way. An example is a student that spends extra time studying for a test because he or she wants a better grade in the class.

What is Career Motivation?

In order to motivate yourself towards a...
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